Dodgers finish off Braves in four games, advance to NLCS

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The Dodgers have punched their ticket to the NLCS.

Thanks to some late-inning heroics from Juan Uribe, the Dodgers defeated the Braves 4-3 tonight at Dodger Stadium to finish off the NLDS in four games. This will be the franchise’s 10th trip to the NLCS and their first since 2009.

The Dodgers jumped out to an early 2-0 lead behind a pair of solo homers from Carl Crawford, but the Braves found their way back into the game behind a pair of defensive miscues in the top of the fourth inning. Clayton Kershaw did fine on short rest, allowing two unearned runs over six innings, but Freddy Garcia matched him for the most part. Atlanta would eventually take the lead in the top of the seventh inning via an RBI single from Jose Constanza, but the Dodgers pulled ahead for good when Uribe took David Carpenter deep for a dramatic two-run homer in the bottom of the eighth inning. The go-ahead homer was set up on a double by Yasiel Puig. Kenley Jansen struck out the side in the ninth inning to lock down the victory.

While the Dodgers have advanced, they’ll won’t know their opponent until the Pirates and Cardinals square off in Game 5 of their series on Wednesday. The NLCS is set to begin on Friday and Zack Greinke should be lined up for the assignment.

David DeJesus retires

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Outfielder David DeJesus announced his retirement from Major League Baseball on Twitter Wednesday afternoon. He’ll be joining CSN Chicago for Cubs coverage.

DeJesus, 37, spent 13 seasons in the big leagues from 2003-15 with the Royals, Athletics, Cubs, Nationals, Rays, and Angels. He hit a composite .275/.349/.512 with 99 home runs and 573 RBI across 5,916 plate appearances.

We wish the best of luck to DeJesus as he begins a new career in sports media.

Dallas Green: 1934-2017

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Former major league pitcher, manager, and front office executive Dallas Green has died at the age of 82, Jon Heyman of FanRag Sports reports.

Green pitched for the Phillies for the first five years of his career from 1960-64, then went to the Washington Sentators, the Mets, and back to the Phillies before retiring after the ’67 season. He managed the Phillies from 1979-81, leading them to the organization’s first ever championship in ’80. The Cubs hired Green after the 1981 season to serve as executive vice president and general manager. He quit after the ’87 season. Green briefly managed the Yankees in ’89, then took the helm of the Mets from ’93-96.

Green was a controversial figure during his managing and GM days as he was not afraid to say exactly what he was thinking. He got into many conflicts with his players and coaches, but some think it helped the Phillies in the World Series in 1980. The Phillies inducted him into their Wall of Fame in 2006.