Division Series - St Louis Cardinals v Pittsburgh Pirates - Game Three

The Marlon Byrd trade has worked out well for the Pirates

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If you had Marlon Byrd as a trade acquisition making the biggest impact in the post-season, please step forward to claim your prize. Everything about the 35-year-old’s 2013 season has been unlikely, from the 21 home runs and .848 OPS he posted in five months with the Mets, to the three homers and .843 OPS he compiled in a month-plus with the Pirates, to the second-inning home run he hit to stake the Pirates to a 1-0 lead in the Wild Card game against the Reds, to tonight’s outstanding performance in Game 3 of the NLDS against the Cardinals.

The Pirates picked up Byrd (and John Buck) from the Mets on August 27 for Minor Leaguers Dilson Herrera and Vic Black. At the time, the Pirates were still in a knock-down, drag-out fight in the NL Central with the Cardinals and Reds, and Byrd was as good an upgrade as was available at the time. Like most moves GM Neal Huntington has made to put together the current iteration of the Pirates roster, this move has been a boon to the club.

Byrd went 2-for-3 with a two-run single in the first, a double in the sixth that helped move Andrew McCutchen to third base (he would subsequently score), and a walk in the eighth inning to set the stage for Pedro Alvarez, who would knock in the game-winning run with a single to right. Byrd was the catalyst for the Pirates, involved in every meaningful run they scored tonight, defeating the Cardinals by a 5-3 margin.

If the Pirates are able to advance to the NLCS, whether tomorrow at home or on Wednesday in St. Louis, they will have many players to thank, but Byrd will certainly be at the top of the list. Who knew a 35-year-old journeyman outfielder with a career .749 OPS would be such an important contributor in the post-season?

Tim Tebow hits a homer in his first instructional league at bat

PORT ST. LUCIE, FL - SEPTEMBER 20: Tim Tebow #15 of the New York Mets hits a home run at an instructional league day at Tradition Field on September 20, 2016 in Port St. Lucie, Florida. (Photo by Rob Foldy/Getty Images)
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Because of course he did.

It wasn’t just his first at bat, but it was his first pitch. It came off of John Kilichowski, an 11th round draft pick of the St. Louis Cardinals out of Vanderbilt.  The ball went out to left center, off the bat of the lefty Tebow.

Next time, meat, throw him a breaking ball.

Joaquin Benoit blames overly-sensitive hitters for benches-clearing incidents

TORONTO, CANADA - SEPTEMBER 12: Joaquin Benoit #53 of the Toronto Blue Jays delivers a pitch in the seventh inning during MLB game action against the Tampa Bay Rays on September 12, 2016 at Rogers Centre in Toronto, Ontario, Canada. (Photo by Tom Szczerbowski/Getty Images)
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The other night, Blue Jays reliever Joaquin Benoit needed help getting off the field after the second benches-clearing incident with the Yankees. It was later revealed that Benoit tore a calf muscle during the fracas, ending his season.

Yesterday he pointed the finger at just about everyone else for the incidents like the one that led to his injury. Hitters specifically. From The Star:

“I believe as pitchers we’re entitled to use the whole plate and pitch in if that’s the way we’re going to succeed,” Benoit said. “I believe that right now baseball is taking things so far that in some situations most hitters believe that they can’t be brushed out. Some teams take it personally.”

That “take it personally” line is interesting coming from Benoit as, in this instance, it seemed pretty clear that the whole plunking exchange which led to his injury started because Josh Donaldson took an inside pitch that did not seem to be a purpose pitch at all, too personally.

Did Benoit take a veiled swipe at his teammate here? If so, that’s pretty notable. If not it’s notable in another way, right? As it suggests that Benoit believes it’s OK for his teammates to take issue with inside pitches but anyone else who does is part of the problem?

Which is it, Joaquin?