Behind David Ortiz’s two-homer night, Red Sox take a 2-0 lead in the ALDS

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The Red Sox will head down to Tampa Bay happy campers. After a thorough 12-2 dismantling of the Rays in Game 1, the Sox scored seven runs against 2012 AL Cy Young award winner David Price in seven-plus innings, just enough run support for John Lackey.

The scoring started early, with Jacoby Ellsbury leading off the game with a single, stealing second base and forcing a throwing error to advance to third base, then scoring on Dustin Pedroia’s sacrifice fly. David Ortiz added a well-struck home run to right-center to make it 2-0.

After the Rays clawed back for a run in the top of the second on a Delmon Young sac fly, the Sox scored another two runs in the bottom of the third on a double by Jacoby Ellsbury and an RBI fielder’s choice by Pedroia. The Sox would make it 5-1 in the fourth on an RBI triple by Stephen Drew.

The Rays did a good job against Lackey, tagging him for seven hits and three walks. James Loney struck a big blow in the fifth, driving a two-run double to center to make it 5-3. With Loney on second, the Rays had two opportunities to draw closer or even tie the game, but after Evan Longoria walked, Ben Zobrist struck out to end the rally.

As quickly as the Rays got those two runs, the Red Sox took one back. Ellsbury led off the inning with a single, then used his speed to score from first on a Pedroia double off the Green Monster.

Lackey took the hill for the sixth, but the Rays chased him quickly. Desmond Jennings led off the inning with a single, then advanced to second on Young’s ground out. He came around to score from second on an RBI single to right by Yunel Escobar. Rays manager Joe Maddon then pinch-hit catcher Jose Molina with the left-handed Matt Joyce, prompting Red Sox manager John Farrell to take out Lackey in favor of lefty reliever Craig Breslow. Breslow retired Joyce and then Sean Rodriguez to exit the inning without any further damage. Breslow also pitched a scoreless seventh in support of Lackey. Junichi Tazawa worked around a one-out single by Young in the eighth.

In the bottom of the eighth, Ortiz struck again, leading off the inning with a home run to right field that wrapped around Pesky’s Pole for his second home run of the night. Prior to Ortiz, the last Red Sox hitter to homer twice in a post-season game was Pedroia in Game 2 of the ALCS against the Rays in 2008.

Closer Koji Uehara disposed of the Rays quickly in the ninth, striking out Joyce and Jose Lobaton, then getting Wil Myers to ground out to first to make the 7-4 Sox victory official. He threw 11 pitches, all of them strikes. Now up 2-0 in the ALDS, the two teams will head down to Tampa for Game 3 on Monday. Red Sox starter Clay Buchholz will oppose Rays starter Alex Cobb.

Drew Smyly has a torn UCL, will undergo Tommy John surgery

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Ryan Divish of the Seattle Times reports that Mariners starter Drew Smyly has a torn UCL and will undergo Tommy John surgery.

Smyly was diagnosed with a flexor strain in his left elbow at the end of spring training. He had been on the shelf since then, but was throwing bullpen sessions. He was set to throw his first simulated game today, but that was scratched after he said his arm didn’t feel right in his last throwing session. The Mariners called it “a little setback.” A reexamination shows that this is not little, obviously.

The Mariners acquired Smyly in January for outfielder Mallex Smith and two minor leaguers, and were expected to utilize the lefty as a core member of their rotation in 2017. Now he’s going to miss all of this season and, given that he’s on a one-year deal, will be released by the team at the end of the season. Odds are that he’ll be unable to pitch for most of 2018.

Tough break.

Miguel Montero to be designated for assignment

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A play in three acts:

I.

Miguel Montero talks smack about his teammate

II.

A team leader talks smack about Miguel Montero

III.

The Cubs get rid of Miguel Montero:

This is rather surprising. As I said in the last post, I figured he’d apologize today and it’d all be in the past. Guess not. Even more surprising: we learned earlier this week that the key to good clubhouse chemistry is having a teammate everyone hates. Guess that only works for the Giants.

Montero is making $14 million this season, so the Cubs are definitely eating some money to make a headache go away. They’re also losing some offensive production, as Montero has hit a nice .286/.366/.439 on the season. His terrible defense against opposing baserunners mitigates that, of course. And the whole “pissing off everyone in the clubhouse” thing isn’t exactly working out for him either, so here we are.

Oh well, have a good one, Miguel.