Matt Moore

Youthful Rays appear rattled in Game 1 rout

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Technically, the Rays went errorless in Friday’s 12-2 loss to the Red Sox. Which just further demonstrates how silly judging things based on errors can be.

After three innings without allowing a hit, Matt Moore gave up a Dustin Pedroia single to start the fourth with the Rays up 2-0. David Ortiz followed with a long drive to the warning track in right. Wil Myers had the ball lined up, only to let it drop at the last minute. He thought someone called him off, though center fielder Desmond Jennings did no such thing. The incident happened in front of the Red Sox bullpen, but if a reliever was trying to throw Myers off, it wasn’t captured on camera. Maybe a fan called for the ball, though with all the noise, it’s hard to see how that would have gotten through. Myers, himself, didn’t seem to have any idea who called him off. Perhaps we’ll find out after the game (And we did, Myers said he wasn’t called off, just that he saw Jennings out of the corner of his eye and gave up on the ball).

The ball ended up bouncing over the fence for a double. And the floodgates were opened. With the score tied 2-2, Stephen Drew hit a little grounder to James Loney’s right that the first baseman handled. Moore was just a smidgen late getting over to cover, then compounded his mistake by realizing too late that Jonny Gomes was trying to score from second. That made it 3-2. Jacoby Ellsbury later reached on a strikeout/passed ball. The inning ended at 5-2.

The follies kept coming in the fifth. Mike Napoli should have been thrown out easily trying for second on his shot off the Green Monster, but Sean Rodriguez’s throw was poor and he was called safe (though he appeared to be out anyway). An intentional walk followed, then came another double, again poorly played by Rodriguez. That resulted in Moore’s exit. After the second out of the inning, Will Middlebrooks was intentionally walked. Ellsbury then hit a shot back up the middle that ricocheted off Wesley Wright’s glove and past Yunel Escobar at shortstop. 8-2.

Four more runs followed in the eighth.

Myers, the AL Rookie of the Year favorite, heard it all game after his miscue and finished 0-for-4.

Moore, a 17-game winner in the regular season, ended up allowing eight runs — seven earned — in 4 1/3 innings. Maybe only three of those runs were truly earned, but the fourth-inning mental error loomed large.

The Rays will probably put Moore in the pen for the rest of the series now, though he likely won’t be available until Game 4. Because of the two off days, Game 2 starter David Price can come back and pitch if there’s a Game 5.

No structural damage found in Andrew Benintendi’s knee

ST. PETERSBURG, FL - AUGUST 24:  Shortstop Matt Duffy #5 of the Tampa Bay Rays tags out Andrew Benintendi #40 of the Boston Red Sox after Dustin Pedroia grounded into the double play  during the seventh inning of a game on August 24, 2016 at Tropicana Field in St. Petersburg, Florida. (Photo by Brian Blanco/Getty Images)
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Good news in Boston: An MRI on Red Sox outfielder Andrew Benintendi‘s left knee revealed no structural damage.

Benintendi slipped while trying to avoid a tag at second base, injuring his leg, but it appears he’s avoided a serious injury. A timetable for his return isn’t known at this point, but the Red Sox expect to get him back before the end of the season.

Benintendi is hitting .324/.365/.485 with a homer and ten RBI in 21 games.

Carlos Ruiz leaves a goodbye note for the Phillies

CLEARWATER, FL - FEBRUARY 26:  Carlos Ruiz #51 of the Philadelphia Phillies poses for a portrait on February 26, 2016 at Bright House Field in Clearwater, Florida.  (Photo by Elsa/Getty Images)
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And then there was one. One player from the 2008 World Series champs, that is. Ryan Howard likely isn’t going anywhere so he’ll be the last one to turn the lights off, but today Carlo Ruiz bid adieu to the Phillies following his trade to Los Angeles.

Lost in all of the emotions the Dodgers are reported to be feeling about A.J. Ellis leaving is the fact that Ruiz was one of the most beloved Phillies players ever, by both his teammates and their fans. Yesterday Roy Halladay penned a heartfelt goodbye to Ruiz, suggesting that he was every bit as essential to his and the Phillies’ success as Ellis has been to Clayton Kershaw (and in pure baseball production, obviously, quite more).

Today Chooch left a message for his now former teammates: