Remember when Yasiel Puig was gonna cost the Dodgers a playoff game with his recklessness?

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Last night, Yasiel Puig’s smart, heads-up base running got the Dodgers a run. His arm in right — and the manner in which he kinda deked Even Gattis as to whether he was gonna catch a ball and then throw — ended the Braves second inning when he doubled Gattis off first. It was quite a playoff debut for the Dodgers rookie.

Which makes it a perfect time to go down the memory hole. Specifically, back to August, when Yasiel Puig was supposed to be unsafe at any speed and was going to cost the Dodgers playoff games with his lack of discipline and unprofessionalism. First, Bill Plaschke:

Puig’s antics are the sort that will cost a team in a close game in October. For every playoff game that Puig wins with his bold arm or crazy legs, he could cost them two.

Then Jon Morosi:

Then Scott Miller:

Puig clearly has the talent to lead the Dodgers to an October title. And he clearly contains the recklessness to push the team bus straight over a cliff. Self-made man meets self-destruction, head on … with each home run and highlight-reel moment, the monster grows. Biggest question this season now is this: Can the Dodgers eke a Kirk Gibson moment out of Puig this October before they get a Frankenstein moment? … this late-night carousing, cutoff-man missing, curfew busting phenom borders on going berserk-o out of control.

I am about 95% certain that they will be followed up today by Plaschke, Morosi and Miller with some kind of “look how Puig has learned his lesson!” stuff. They’ll say the Dodgers did address it. That Puig has matured. That their lessons — which were mocked — mocked! — as alarmism went heeded and look how prescient we were. It’ll be an exercise in the authors of this narrative putting a nice little bow on a drama they have created.

Only problem: back in August, when Puig was a monster, the sentiment was that he was not going to learn his lesson because Don Mattingly did not bench him for an extended period of time. Again, Plaschke:

They needed to bench him Tuesday. But they couldn’t bear to bench him for the entire game.

He needs to learn. But Mattingly showed that he’s unwilling to possibly sacrifice a victory to finish the lecture … With one swing Puig won a game, but, in playing him, the Dodgers risked losing much more.

The others were likewise dissatisfied with the Dodgers not putting Puig in his place more authoritatively. And since August I am not aware of anyone reporting any changes in Puig or the Dodgers’ approach to him.

But no matter. I’m sure the “Puig is out of control caucus” will forget all of that. I’m sure that they will come forward today with some variation of “look how the wild horse has been tamed” and offer Puig’s coolheadedness, excellent defense and excellent base running last night as evidence that their hand-wringing over his attitude, defense and base running was totally warranted.

Or else they’ll just pretend they never said any of that because when you’re a kneejerk pundit it pays to have no memory of past positions.

Oh.

Will Middlebrooks carted off field with injury

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Phillies third baseman Will Middlebrooks suffered a serious injury during Saturday’s Grapefruit League contest against the Orioles. The infielder was chasing down a pop fly in the eighth inning when he ran into left fielder Andrew Pullin, who inadvertently trapped Middlebrooks’ ankle under his leg. Middlebrooks was unable to put weight on his leg following the collision and was carted off the field and taken to a local hospital for X-rays.

Per MLB.com’s Todd Zolecki, not much is known yet about the severity of the ankle injury or the recovery time it will require, though it appears serious enough to set Middlebrooks back considerably as he seeks a backup/bench role with the team this spring.

The 29-year-old is currently seeking another opportunity to extend his six-year major-league career in 2018. He’s coming off of two down years with the Brewers and Rangers, during which he slashed a cumulative .169/.229/.262 with four extra bases through 70 plate appearances.