Albert Pujols sues Jack Clark over PED allegations

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It’s quite a litigious day around Major League Baseball. First A-Rod, now Albert Pujols:

Former Cardinals slugger Albert Pujols is suing former Cardinals star Jack Clark over comments Clark made accusing Pujols of using steroids. The suit was filed Friday in St. Louis County.

You’ll recall that Clark accused Pujols of using steroids on Clark’s short-lived radio show back in August. His claim at the time was that Pujols’ trainer, Chris Mihlfeld told Clark about Pujols’ alleged steroid use while Clark and Mihlfeld were both on staff in the late 1990s with the Los Angels Dodgers. Mihfeld denied Clark’s claims about any such conversations and Pujols has vehemently denied steroid use. Clark and his co-host were fired after the incident.

As I’ve explained at length in the past, there is a lot to lose when you sue for defamation, even if you are telling the truth and even if the defendant is lying. As such, many public figures like Pujols let such things pass than to go through the expense and hassle of filing suit.

Pujols, however, obviously feels strongly about this. And if Clark has spread malicious lies about him, it’s completely understandable that he’d sue, even though success is not guaranteed.

Report: Mets have discussed a Matt Harvey trade with at least two teams

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Kristie Ackert of the New York Daily News reports that the Mets have discussed a trade involving starter Matt Harvey with at least two teams. Apparently, the Mets were even willing to move Harvey for a reliever.

The Mets tendered Harvey a contract on December 1. He’s entering his third and final year of arbitration eligibility and will likely see a slight bump from last season’s salary of $5.125 million. As a result, there was some thought going into late November that the Mets would non-tender Harvey.

Harvey, 28, made 18 starts and one relief appearance last year and had horrendous results. He put up a 6.70 ERA with a 67/47 K/BB ratio in 92 2/3 innings. Between his performance, his impending free agency, and his injury history, the Mets aren’t likely to get much back in return for Harvey. Even expecting a reliever in return may be too lofty.

Along with bullpen help, the Mets also need help at second base, first base, and the outfield. They don’t have many resources with which to address those needs. Ackert described the Mets’ resources as “a very limited stash of prospects” and “limited payroll space.”