A.J. Burnett’s dud could end career on a sour note

18 Comments

Despite another strong season in which he posted a 3.30 ERA and finished fifth in the NL with 209 strikeouts, free-agent-to-be A.J. Burnett is contemplating retirement this winter. It’s hard to imagine that he’ll want to go out like that, though.

Burnett was blasted for seven runs in two-plus innings Thursday in the Pirates’ Game 1 loss to the Cardinals. After starting off with a pair of scoreless innings, he retired none of the seven hitters he faced in the third.

The outing left the 36-year-old Burnett 2-3 with a 6.37 ERA in eight postseason starts. He has two World Series rings anyway. The first came with the Marlins in 2003, though he didn’t pitch in October that year after Tommy John surgery. He also got one in 2009, when the Yankees won in spite of his struggles. Burnett did pitch well in his previous postseason start in the 2011 ALDS against the Tigers, allowing one run in 5 2/3 innings and picking up a win.

The Pirates will probably go back to Burnett in Game 5 against the Cardinals if the series gets that far, though they’d certainly have him on a shorter leash in that one than they did today. Game 2 starter, Gerrit Cole, would also be able to pitch Game 5 on normal rest, which could set up a tough decision if Cole excels tomorrow. The Pirates are going to need him to if they’re going to have much of a shot at coming back in the series.

Troy Tulowitzki poses as a pitcher on photo day

Tom Szczerbowski/Getty Images
6 Comments

Update: The photographer was apparently in on the action, according to Topps. Still pretty funny. (Hat tip: Mike Ashmore)

*

Thursday marked photo day for the Blue Jays. There are always some oddities, usually when the players create fun for themselves. This time, the fun happened when a photographer mistook shortstop Troy Tulowitzki for a pitcher. Tulowitzki rolled with it and followed the photographer’s instructions to pose like a pitcher.

Hazel Mae has the hilarious video:

Hitters, of course, typically pose with a bat over their shoulder. Pitchers typically have their hand in their glove, sometimes leaning forward as if receiving the signs from their catcher.

Tulowitzki has exclusively played shortstop during his 12-year career in the majors, but perhaps one day he’ll step on the mound and be able to call himself a pitcher.