Joe Girardi has options and leverage. Including a possible slot in the Fox booth.

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With the Yankees season over a lot of attention will be paid to A-Rod’s arbitration, which starts today, and Robinson Cano’s fre agency, which starts as soon as the playoffs are over.  But there is another loose end which is pretty darn important too: Joe Girardi.

Girardi is a managerial free agent, essentially, as he’s not under contract for 2014. Joel Sherman says that it feels like he wants to stay in New York. Buster Olney says that, while that may be true, Girardi is going to demand a significant raise to do it. Sherman adds this:

But there are real opportunities out there for Girardi. Tim McCarver’s spot in the Fox national booth is opening. Harold Reynolds and John Smoltz are perceived as strong candidates. But sources said the network loves Girardi and would strongly consider him.

He adds that the Cubs may have a managerial opening too and reminds us that Girardi is an Illinois guy, hailing from Peoria, going to Northwestern and playing for the Cubs.

Whether Girardi wants to leave the dugout for the booth or go to a rebuilding situation is an open question. But whether or not the Yankees should want him back in the Bronx shouldn’t be. He got more out of less talent this season than anyone. He has kept the clubhouse operating on an even keel despite all manner of controversy and scrutiny. He deals deftly with big egos and big media and the Yankees would be hard pressed who could do his job better than him. It’s just a matter if he wants it.

Either way, he’ll be making good money in 2014. And after a tumultuous 2013, it’s hard to say he won’t deserve it.

Joe Maddon: “I have a defensive foot fetish.”

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The Cubs’ defense — or lack thereof this year — has been a topic of conversation as it could help explain why the team hasn’t played at the elite level it played at last year.

Manager Joe Maddon tried to go into detail about that but ended up channeling his inner Rex Ryan. Via CSN Chicago’s Patrick Mooney.

Well then.

The Nationals have scored 62 runs during four Joe Ross starts

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If, in the future, Joe Ross ever complains about a lack of run support, point to his first four starts of the 2017 season.

Ross started on April 19 in Atlanta against the Braves, on April 25 in Colorado against the Rockies, on April 30 at home against the Mets, and on May 23 at home against the Mariners. In those games, the Nats’ offense scored 14, 15, 23, and 10 runs respectively for a total of 62 runs, or an average of 15.5 per start. Ross was the pitcher of record for seven, eight, 10, and 10 runs for a total of 35 runs (8.75 runs per start), which would still make him the major league leader in run support by that restrictive standard.

Among qualified starters — Ross did not qualify — entering Tuesday’s action, the Rockies’ Antonio Senzatela led the way according to ESPN, averaging 7.11 runs of support in nine starts. The Rockies scored double-digit runs in only three of those starts, oddly enough.

Per the Nationals, the 62 runs of support for Ross is a major league record in a pitcher’s first four starts of a season.