Marlins owner Jeffrey Loria fires longtime GM/president Larry Beinfest

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Marlins owner Jeffrey Loria has fired former general manager and current president of baseball operations Larry Beinfest, who’d been with the team since 2002.

Clark Spencer of the Miami Herald reported last week that Loria had essentially pushed Beinfest aside in order to make most of the baseball decisions himself, quoting a source who said “he has marginalized the front office.” And then Beinfest went on the local radio and uncharacteristically revealed details about his less than ideal working conditions.

Beinfest is generally well-respected throughout baseball and so getting out from under a meddling owner with a slashed payroll and talent-starved roster may actually come as a relief. He was nearly fired last year, but kept the job, hired Mike Redmond as manager, and saw the Marlins go 59-100.

He’ll no doubt get another high-ranking front office job for next season and will also get to spend his free time feeling sorry for the poor schlub who replaces him in Miami. It sounds like it’ll be longtime assistant general manager Dan Jennings, which keeps Loria from having to convince decent outside candidates to apply for a job working for him.

Autopsy report reveals morphine, Ambien in Roy Halladay’s system

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Traces of morphine, amphetamine, Prozac and Ambien were found in Roy Halladay’s system at the time of his death, according to the autopsy findings Zachary T. Sampson of the Tampa Bay Times reported Friday. The former Phillies and Blue Jays ace and two-time Cy Young Award winner was killed in a plane crash off the Gulf of Mexico last November. While the exact cause of the incident has not yet been determined, it was a combination of blunt force trauma and drowning that resulted in the 40-year-old’s death.

Further details from the NY Daily News revealed that Halladay sustained a fractured leg and a “subdural hemorrhage, multiple rib fractures, and lung, liver and spleen injuries” during the crash. As for the drugs present in his system, the autopsy report suggests that the presence of morphine could be linked to heroin use, though there’s no clear evidence that he did so.

The toxicology results also determined that Halladay had a blood-alcohol content level of 0.01. A BAC of 0.08 is the legal limit for operating a car, but current FAA regulations prohibit any alcohol consumption for eight hours before operating aircraft. Halladay was both the pilot and sole passenger aboard the plane when it crashed.

Previous statements from the National Transportation Safety Board indicate that the investigation is still ongoing and could take up to two years to resolve.