And That Happened: Thursday’s scores and highlights

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Rangers 6, Angels 5: They were up then down then bang! Jurickson Profar with the walkoff blast. This one would’ve been way easier, however, if Mitch Moreland, Ian Kinsler and Adrian Beltre all hadn’t committed errors in the second inning, allowing three unearned runs. But it was a must-win game and the Rangers won.

Indians 6, Twins 5: A win, sure, but the way Chris Perez nearly coughed up a 6-1 lead the day after getting a vote of confidence from Terry Francona has to make Cleveland nervous. Apart from mopup duty or innings eating in games where the Tribe has, like, a 12-run lead, he’ll likely be watching the rest of this series from the bullpen bench.

Rays 4, Yankees 0: The Rays finish off a sweep of the Yankees with ease — they outscored New York 17-3 — but the real story here was the farewell of Mariano Rivera. It wasn’t a save situation, but his final home game was pretty familiar stuff: zeros across the board apart from the innings pitched and pitch count. And the way he was taken out of the game was as touching as can be.

Braves 7, Phillies 1: Jason Heyward was 5 for 5 and David Hale allowed only one run over six innings. See, Brian McCann? That’s how you keep the opposition from crossing home plate.

Padres 3, Diamondbacks 2: Alexi Amarista hit an RBI single in the 11th inning, ending the home portion of the Padres season. They were 45-36 at home this year. Not bad for a team that, overall, has only won 75 games. Since I got back late Monday I’ve been trying to convince my bosses at NBC that I’d perform better in San Diego too, but they’re not buying it.

Orioles 3, Blue Jays 2: Miguel Gonzalez pitched seven innings of two-hit ball. Matt Wieters homered. After the game Wieters said “that was vintage Miggy” of Gonzalez’s performance. Gonzalez has one and a half years experience.

Brewers 4, Mets 2: Johnny Hellweg beaned David Wright in the head. Wright is OK, but damn, I hope these final meaningless games are worth it for Wright. The beaning wasn’t intentional. Afterward Hellweg said “That’s the last guy on the team I want to hit.” I’d be curious to see his list of priorities.

Giants 3, Dodgers 2: This could’ve been the final game for Tim Lincecum in a Giants uniform. If so, not too bad: seven innings, eight hits, two runs and a no-decision. Angel Pagan’s homer in the eighth broke a 2-2- tie.

Royals 3, White Sox 2: David Lough hit a two-run homer and Jeremy Guthrie pitched well. It was the Royals’ 84th win, which is their best total since 1993.

Rockies acquire Zac Rosscup from Cubs

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The Rockies announced a minor swap of relief pitchers on Monday evening. The Cubs sent lefty Zac Rosscup to the Rockies in exchange for right-hander Matt Carasiti.

Rosscup, 29, was designated for assignment by the Cubs last Thursday. He spent only two-thirds of an inning in the majors this year and has a 5.32 career ERA across 47 1/3 innings. Rosscup has spent most of the season with Triple-A Iowa, posting a 2.60 ERA in 27 2/3 innings.

Carasiti, 25, spent 15 2/3 innings in the majors last year, putting up an ugly 9.19 ERA. With Triple-A Albuquerque this season, he compiled a 2.37 ERA and a 43/13 K/BB ratio in 30 1/3 innings.

U.S. Court of Appeals affirms ruling that the minor leagues are exempt from federal antitrust law

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The Associated Press reported that on Monday, the U.S. Court of Appeals for the 9th Circuit affirmed a district court ruling which holds that the minor leagues are exempt from federal antitrust law, just like the major leagues.

In 2015, four minor leaguers sued Major League Baseball, alleging that MLB violated antitrust laws with its hiring and employment policies. They accused MLB of “restrain[ing] horizontal competition between and among” franchises and “artificially and illegally depressing” the salaries of minor league players.

The U.S. Court of Appeals said the players failed to state an antitrust claim, as the Curt Flood Act of 1998 exempted Minor League Baseball explicitly from antitrust laws.

This case is separate from the Aaron Senne case in which Major League Baseball is accused of violating the Fair Labor Standards Act. That case was recertified as a class action lawsuit in March. In December, Major League Baseball established a political action committee (PAC), which came months after two members of Congress sought to change language in the FLSA so that minor league players could continue to be paid substandard wages.