Robinson Cano reportedly seeking a $305 million contract. Um, OK.

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Not $300M. It has to be $305M because, I dunno, taxes maybe. Yeah, let’s go with taxes:

 

Folks: it’s going to be silly season soon. Misinformation, both accidental and tactically-placed misinformation, is going to reign supreme when it comes to Cano’s free agency. There are too many reporters and too many leakers covering it and everyone has an incentive to frame the narrative which surrounds it all.

For example: if you’re the Yankees and you don’t think you can or will sign Cano, you’re going to want to make it seem like he’s unreasonable so you don’t come off as cheap. At the same time, if your’e Cano’s people you’re going to have your own agenda and we’ll likely see a lot of that kind of spin too.Not saying that’s what this is — who knows? — but that dynamic always seems to happen with the big stars.

But just look back to the past few years and remember how silly things get reported about big free agents and then remember how, for the most part, sanity comes back to the fore. Then chuckle these things off.

Padres sign Jordan Lyles

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The Padres announced on Sunday that the club signed pitcher Jordan Lyles to a one-year major league contract with a club option for 2019. According to Jon Heyman of FanRag Sports, Lyles will earn $750,000 in 2018. Pitcher Travis Wood was designated for assignment to create room on the 40-man roster for Lyles.

Lyles, 27, had miserable results between the Rockies and Padres last season, compiling an aggregate 7.75 ERA with a 55/22 K/BB ratio over 69 2/3 innings. While he specifically gave up 24 earned runs in 23 innings across five starts with the Padres, it was a small sample. A full season at the pitcher-friendly Petco Park, as opposed to Colorado’s Coors Field, might help revitalize his career.

Wood, 30, went to the Padres at the non-waiver trade deadline from the Royals this past season. Overall, the lefty posted an aggregate 6.80 ERA with a 65/45 K/BB ratio in 94 innings. He’ll earn $6.5 million this season and has an $8 million mutual option with a $1 million buyout for 2019. So, the Padres are just eating $7.5 million minus the league minimum, assuming Wood latches on elsewhere.