Bud Selig

Bud Selig on the Oakland Coliseum: “it’s a pit”

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Bud Selig was on John Feinstein’s radio show. Unlike yesterday, today Feinstein left the opinion-offering to others. Good move! Selig was asked about a lot of things. Two of note. First the A’s stadium situation. Here’s what he said about the Colisuem

“It’s a pit,” Selig said. “It reminds me of old County Stadium and Shea Stadium. We need to deal with that. I’ve had a committee working on it for two or three years, and there’s no question we’re going to have to solve that problem.”

When? Well, there’s a lawsuit and that committee’s agenda is about as barren as the Mojave, but he’ll solve it, by gum.  I wish I thought the San Jose lawsuit had a better chance of succeeding and thus the antitrust exemption scuttled, but I’m highly skeptical. When it gets dismissed it’ll be back in Selig’s court and I suppose we’ll be waiting around forever again.

The second topic: a generic softball about Hank Aaron being the true home run king. It’s a topic I hate because it’s just designed for people to offer their judgment about PEDs. Which is fine as far as it goes, but it’s not so fine when their opinion of such matters causes them to pretend that certain things never happened. Note: MLB still recognizes Barry Bonds as the home run champ. You don’t have to like it. You don’t have to say that Bonds was better than Aaron in your view if you don’t want to. But you can’t wish away the actual records as matters of fact.

That said, I like Selig’s answer:

“Henry Aaron and I, as you know, have been extremely close friends for 58 years now; it’s hard to believe,” Selig said. “I believe he’s the greatest player of my generation. I saw him – I wish everybody could have seen him in the ’50s when he was young and not trying to pull everything. He was unbelievable to watch. Unbelievable. He’s a man of class, a man of dignity. He’s represented our sport beautifully, and his carer is legendary. I’m not going to say any more on that. You can figure out from my answer, I’m sure.”

Say what you want about Selig — and there’s a lot to say — but I like when he talks about this stuff because when he does it he sounds like a baseball fan. And he is a baseball fan. No matter what he’s done or not done, you can tell he loves the game. That, even if he’s the commissioner and views these things differently than I do, I could at least sit and have a baseball debate with him about it rather than have him be some joyless Bowie Kuhn type.

Zack Greinke named the Dbacks’ Opening Day starter

SCOTTSDALE, AZ - FEBRUARY 21:  Pitcher Zack Greinke #21 of the Arizona Diamondbacks poses for a portrait during photo day at Salt River Fields at Talking Stick on February 21, 2017 in Scottsdale, Arizona.  (Photo by Christian Petersen/Getty Images)
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Not a surprise, but a news item on a slow news day is a news item on a slow news day: Diamondbacks manager Torey Lovullo has named Zack Greinke as the club’s Opening Day starter.

Greinke’s first season with the Diamondbacks is not exactly what the club hoped for when he signed a six-year, $206.5 million deal in December of 2015. He dealt with oblique and shoulder issues while struggling to a 4.37 ERA over 26 starts. Greinke hasn’t pitched yet this spring, but will make his spring debut on Friday. He and the club are obviously hoping for a quiet March and a strong beginning to the season.

Either for its own sake or to increase the trade value of a player who was acquired by the previous front office regime.

“La Vida Baseball,” celebrating Latino baseball, launches

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A new website has launched. It’s called “La Vida Baseball,” and it’s all about celebrating the past, present and future of Latino baseball from a Latino perspective.

The site, produced in partnership with the Hall of Fame, has four general areas of focus:

  • Who’s Now: Focusing on current Latino players;
  • Who’s Next: Focusing on top prospects here, in the Caribbean and in Central and South America;
  • Our Life: Off-the-Field stuff, including player’s lives, lifestyles and hobbies; and
  • Our Legends: Focusing on Latino baseball history, Hall of Famers and overlooked players.

As the site has just launched there aren’t yet a ton of stories up there, but there is one about Roberto Clemente, another about Felix Hernandez and some other stuff.

The site is much-needed. Baseball reporters for American outlets are overwhelmingly white, non-Spanish speakers. Reporters, who, generally, gravitate to the players who are the most like they are. Which is understandable on some level. When you’re writing stories about people you need to be able to communicate with them and relate to them on more than a mere perfunctory level. As such, no matter how good the intentions of baseball media, we tend to see the clubhouse and the culture of baseball from a distinctly American perspective. And we tend to paint Latino players with a broad, broad brush.

La Vida Baseball will, hopefully, remedy all of that and will, hopefully, give us a fresh and insightful depiction Latino players and their culture.