Some Dodgers may have peed in the Chase Field pool during their celebration

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Well, this certainly puts a new spin on the Dodgers-Dbacks rivalry, Swimming Pool-Gate and all of that. Anthony Jackson reports that maybe it was more than just fun and games going on at Chase Field on Thursday night:

. . . it has come to my attention that one of the Dodgers players who jumped in the pool — and I will do him the favor of leaving his name out of this for now — openly and loudly bragged after leaving the pool about having urinated in it … There also are indications that MULTIPLE Dodgers players urinated into the pool, but I can’t tell you that with any certainty. It’s just what I’ve heard.

This information has changed Jackson’s view of the little celebration from one in which it was fun and harmless to one in which it was sick and classless.

I can see that. I mean, I’m not all that interested in diving deep into the matter of whether or not someone peed in the pool, who it was, whether they are remorseful about it and all of the kind of handwringing that comes up about any weird, off-the-field matter of morals, ethics and taste, but I can see that.

For what it’s worth, I can muster some sharp thoughts about these matters for DUIs and PEDs and all manner of other things — I probably have a greater tolerance for it than most people — but I can’t go there for peeing in pools. I just can’t. At least not until we have a teary confession and an official statement from someone. Or maybe just some silly statements. If this spins silly, sure, I’ll be all over it, but I cant put on my serious/judgmental face for pee in a pool.

In other words: we’re gonna let this story mellow for a bit.

Report: MLB likely to unilaterally implement pace of play changes

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ESPN’s Jerry Crasnick reports that talks between Major League Baseball and the MLB Players’ Association concerning pace of play changes have stalled, which makes it more likely that commissioner Rob Manfred unilaterally implements the changes he seeks. Those changes include a pitch clock and a restriction on catcher mound visits.

Manfred said, “My preferred path is a negotiated agreement with the players. But if we can’t get an agreement, we are going to have rule changes in 2018, one way or the other.”

The players have made several suggestions aimed at reducing the length of games, such as amending replay review rules, strictly monitoring down time between innings, and bringing back bullpen carts.

It is believed that MLB is proposing a pitch clock of 20 seconds. If a pitcher takes too long between pitches, he will have a ball added to the count. If the hitter takes too long, then he will have a strike added to the count.