Nelson Cruz on the Rangers for the playoffs would be an “embarrassment?” Really?

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Headline from Tim Colishaw’s latest at The Dallas Morning News:

source:

Call me crazy, but I feel like missing the playoffs in a late-season collapse would be way worse than playing in them with Cruz. Or even losing in the first round because they don’t have Cruz. But I suppose there are many different levels of embarrassment.

As for the column, everything you need to know comes in this passage:

If the Rangers do qualify and bring back Cruz, one can argue that he served his suspension and paid his debt. I don’t necessarily disagree with that since I’ve stated there is a certain unsettling witch-hunt atmosphere to this pursuit of athletes, particularly in baseball, who use substances to try to enhance their careers.

But …

Put differently: “I believe X about Nelson Cruz, but I have a column to crank out so I’m going to give voice to an argument to the contrary that I just got done telling you I really don’t agree with.” Oh, and the argument to the contrary is basically “some Texas Rangers used PEDs 15 years ago, so maybe the Rangers should tie an arm behind their back if they make the playoffs and sit Cruz in order to pay penance. Or something.” I don’t see anyone calling for the A’s to pay for Jose Canseco’s sins, but maybe Texas has a higher level of moral expectation. I don’t know.

How about this: we treat drug suspensions like every other suspension. When a player is done serving his suspension, he’s done. I realize the Giants made a different call with Melky Cabrera, and yes they got away with it, but I’m not sure how making decisions that weaken your ballclub has suddenly  become reasonable precedent.

Joe Maddon: “I have a defensive foot fetish.”

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The Cubs’ defense — or lack thereof this year — has been a topic of conversation as it could help explain why the team hasn’t played at the elite level it played at last year.

Manager Joe Maddon tried to go into detail about that but ended up channeling his inner Rex Ryan. Via CSN Chicago’s Patrick Mooney.

Well then.

The Nationals have scored 62 runs during four Joe Ross starts

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If, in the future, Joe Ross ever complains about a lack of run support, point to his first four starts of the 2017 season.

Ross started on April 19 in Atlanta against the Braves, on April 25 in Colorado against the Rockies, on April 30 at home against the Mets, and on May 23 at home against the Mariners. In those games, the Nats’ offense scored 14, 15, 23, and 10 runs respectively for a total of 62 runs, or an average of 15.5 per start. Ross was the pitcher of record for seven, eight, 10, and 10 runs for a total of 35 runs (8.75 runs per start), which would still make him the major league leader in run support by that restrictive standard.

Among qualified starters — Ross did not qualify — entering Tuesday’s action, the Rockies’ Antonio Senzatela led the way according to ESPN, averaging 7.11 runs of support in nine starts. The Rockies scored double-digit runs in only three of those starts, oddly enough.

Per the Nationals, the 62 runs of support for Ross is a major league record in a pitcher’s first four starts of a season.