Rays and Indians both win to maintain their respective leads in the AL Wild Card race

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The Rays defeated the Orioles 3-1 this afternoon behind a strong start from Enny Romero in his Major League debut. The left-hander, who spent most of the season with Double-A Montgomery, shut out the O’s in four and two-thirds innings, allowing just one hit while walking four and failing to record a strikeout. The Rays scored in the first on a David DeJesus solo home run and tacked on two more in the sixth. Fernando Rodney allowed a run in the ninth but was able to record his 36th save of the season.

Meanwhile, the Indians had an easy time against the Astros. After falling behind 2-0 in the fourth, the Indians put up a three-spot against Astros starter Erik Bedard. They added a four more in the sixth, three of which were charged to Bedard, who couldn’t record an out in the inning. Corey Kluber had a strong start, allowing just the two runs in five and one-third innings of work. Seven Indians relievers combined for three and two-thirds shutout innings behind Kluber.

The 86-69 Rays maintain a half-game lead over the Indians for the first AL Wild Card spot. The 86-70 Indians saw their lead over the Rangers grow to 1.5 games as Justin Maxwell hit a walk-off grand slam against Rangers reliever Joakim Soria.

The Rays will wrap up their series with the Orioles tomorrow afternoon before going on the road to finish the season against the Yankees and Blue Jays. The Indians will play the White Sox twice at home, then travel to Minnesota for four games before the end of the season.

Game 6: This is why the Astros traded for Justin Verlander

Associated Press
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Houston’s pitching has not been their biggest problem as they’ve watched their 2-0 series lead turn in to a 3-2 series deficit. It has not been good, mind you — Charlie Morton got rocked in Game 3, the bullpen collapsed on Game 4 and Dallas Keuchel was suddenly mortal in Game 5 — but even then it’s not been the biggest concern. The real problem has been the lack of offense.

The Astros led the majors in runs (896), batting average (.282), on-base percentage (.346) and slugging (.478) during the regular season and were second to the Yankees in homers. Despite that, they have scored just nine runs and have hit only one homer. The team’s ALCS batting line, those two wins included, is .147/.234/.213. As such, facing off against Luis Severino and a rested Yankees bullpen tonight can’t give them a ton of confidence.

They do have one thing going for them, however: Justin Verlander. The same Justin Verlander who received only two runs of support in Game 2 of the series but made it hold up thanks to his 124-pitch, 13-strikeout complete game victory. You can’t really expect a starter to do that sort of thing two times in a row, but that’s what the Astros acquired him for at the end of August. In a league where there are vanishingly few horses a team can ride to victory, Verlander stands as one of the few remaining old school aces. Expect A.J. Hinch to keep the bit in Verlander’s mouth for as long as this game is close and, even then, maybe an inning longer.

Is there any reason for optimism regarding the Astros’ lineup? Sure, of course. They didn’t suddenly all forget how to hit. Every team goes through a stretch of 3-5 games where the hits don’t seem to fall. There may, possibly, be some reason for hope in the man they’re facing too. Severino lasted only four innings in Game 2, having been removed early after taking a ground ball off his left wrist. Severino said he was fine and wished that Joe Girardi hadn’t taken him out, but (a) he was acting a little odd, shaking his arm out like he was trying to shake off some pain; and (b) starting pitchers almost always lie and say they’re better than they are. I’m certain Severino is healthy enough to go, but there’s at least a small chance that he’s vulnerable, somehow. At the very least Astros hitters can walk to the plate convincing themselves of it. Any edge you can either get or imagine, right?

Game 6 seems like it will have to be a matter of a small edge one way or another for both teams, really. The Yankees are rolling, but their assignment tonight is a tough one as they try to chase a guy who fancies himself — and has often shown himself — to be a rare throwback to those 1960s and 1970s aces who only seem to get better as the ballgame goes on. The Astros, meanwhile, are tasked with solving a young, fireballing stuff monster who has something to prove after his early exit in Game 2 and, even if he can’t prove it, a corps of relief aces who are among the most formidable in baseball. Add to that the notion that Major League Baseball, Fox and most commentators and casual fans outside of Houston want to see the 12th Yankees-Dodgers World Series matchup and the Astros have to be thinking everything’s against them.

Which is OK, though, right? Ballplayers love it when no one believes in them. That’s not better than six or seven runs of support, but the Astros will take anything they can get at the moment.