Theo Epstein won’t say whether Dale Sveum will be back as Cubs manager

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Cubs president Theo Epstein was asked yesterday whether manager Dale Sveum will be back next season and declined to answer. So does that mean Sveum’s job is truly in jeopardy as he follows up last season’s 61-101 record by going 63-88 this year?

Patrick Mooney of CSNChicago.com delved a little deeper into Epstein’s quotes, including:

There’s no alarm bells to ring. But that’s a subject that gets addressed as a matter of process (after) the season. We’ve been very upfront about the fact that we’re not evaluating Dale on wins and losses. Our record is more of a reflection of the roster that we’ve put on the field as a baseball operations department and where we are in this building process. So I don’t hold Dale accountable for the record.

Of course, not being held accountable for the record doesn’t mean he’s not being held accountable for anything, and if the Cubs feel Sveum has struggled with, for instance, developing the young building blocks on the roster that could be a reason to fire him as well.

Mooney notes that Sveum is under contract for next season and the Cubs hold a team option for 2015. Epstein has generally offered plenty of praise for the job Sveum has done, but not replying with a simple “yes” when asked if a manager who’s under contract for 2014 will be back in 2014 is certainly open for interpretation.

Joe Maddon: “I have a defensive foot fetish.”

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The Cubs’ defense — or lack thereof this year — has been a topic of conversation as it could help explain why the team hasn’t played at the elite level it played at last year.

Manager Joe Maddon tried to go into detail about that but ended up channeling his inner Rex Ryan. Via CSN Chicago’s Patrick Mooney.

Well then.

The Nationals have scored 62 runs during four Joe Ross starts

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If, in the future, Joe Ross ever complains about a lack of run support, point to his first four starts of the 2017 season.

Ross started on April 19 in Atlanta against the Braves, on April 25 in Colorado against the Rockies, on April 30 at home against the Mets, and on May 23 at home against the Mariners. In those games, the Nats’ offense scored 14, 15, 23, and 10 runs respectively for a total of 62 runs, or an average of 15.5 per start. Ross was the pitcher of record for seven, eight, 10, and 10 runs for a total of 35 runs (8.75 runs per start), which would still make him the major league leader in run support by that restrictive standard.

Among qualified starters — Ross did not qualify — entering Tuesday’s action, the Rockies’ Antonio Senzatela led the way according to ESPN, averaging 7.11 runs of support in nine starts. The Rockies scored double-digit runs in only three of those starts, oddly enough.

Per the Nationals, the 62 runs of support for Ross is a major league record in a pitcher’s first four starts of a season.