Shaun Marcum

Shaun Marcum calls out Mets TV announcers

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Shaun Marcum has a lot of spare time on his hands right now since he’s recovering from surgery for thoracic outlet syndrome, so he took to Twitter early yesterday to criticize the Mets television announcers.

Marcum was apparently compelled to write after Ron Darling criticized Frank Francisco for hitting Jayson Werth with a pitch on Thursday. Here’s what Darling said on the SNY broadcast, courtesy of MetsBlog.

“Boy, that was obvious,” Ron Darling said during SNY’s broadcast. ”For you folks at home — and you hear me all the time say ‘That wasn’t intentional.’ Well, this one was intentional. I mean, that’s the silliest thing I’ve ever seen. Base open, behind in the count, nails him in the back. You know what that does? It gets one of your players hit in the next inning. Put [Francisco] up to bat next inning. These things aren’t forgotten, and if it’s not forgotten this season it won’t be next year, either.”

And here’s what Marcum had to say on his Twitter account:

https://twitter.com/ShaunMarcum/status/378427205111406592

https://twitter.com/ShaunMarcum/status/378427524272775168

https://twitter.com/ShaunMarcum/status/378427904847126528

https://twitter.com/ShaunMarcum/status/378428436571627521

Marcum went 1-10 with a 5.29 ERA in 10 starts and two relief appearances with the Mets prior to surgery in July. Darling, Gary Cohen, and Keith Hernandez are widely regarded as one of the best television crews in the business, so such overt criticism is odd and unexpected, but let’s just say that Marcum will not be picking up one of their bobbleheads.

Zach Britton allowed an earned run for the first time since April 30

BALTIMORE, MD - AUGUST 22:  Zach Britton #53 of the Baltimore Orioles pitches for his 38th save in the ninth inning during a baseball game against the the Washington Nationals at Oriole Park at Camden Yards on August 22, 2016 in Baltimore, Maryland.  The Oriole won 4-3.  (Photo by Mitchell Layton/Getty Images)
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Orioles closer Zach Britton had appeared in a major league record 43 consecutive games without allowing an earned run, spanning May 5 to August 22. That streak came to an end on Wednesday evening against the Nationals.

The Orioles entered the bottom of the ninth inning holding a 10-3 lead, but reliever Parker Bridwell immediately found himself in hot water. He yielded back-to-back singles to Danny Espinosa and Clint Robinson. He was able to strike out Trea Turner, but walked Jayson Werth to load the bases. Daniel Murphy then crushed his first career grand slam to make it a 10-7 game. That prompted manager Buck Showalter to bring in Britton.

Britton, too, was knocked around. He served up a single to Bryce Harper, followed by a double to Anthony Rendon that scored Harper, pushing the score to 10-8 and ending Britton’s streak. Wilson Ramos reached on a fielder’s choice back to Britton, but the lefty finally finished the game by getting Ryan Zimmerman to ground into a game-ending 4-6-3 double play.

Britton now holds a nice 0.69 ERA with 38 saves and a 61/16 K/BB ratio in 52 innings of work this season.

A fan fell into the Yankees’ dugout at Safeco Field

SEATTLE, WA - AUGUST 24:  A fan is escorted by police out of the New York Yankees dugout after climbing onto its roof, stumbling and falling into the dugout during the game against the Seattle Mariners at Safeco Field on August 24, 2016 in Seattle, Washington.  (Photo by Otto Greule Jr/Getty Images)
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Per Mark Feinsand of the New York Daily News, a fan fell into the Yankees’ dugout at Safeco Field in the eighth inning of Wednesday afternoon’s game against the Mariners.

The Yankees were heading into the bottom half of the inning when catcher Brian McCann heard “a loud thud” and looked over to find a fan laying on the dugout floor. According to McCann, the fan “basically knocked himself out.”

Manager Joe Girardi said the incident “kind of freaked me out, actually.”

McCann added, “You don’t know his intentions. It looked like he was trying to run on the field, but he didn’t make it there. It could have been worse.”

That McCann and Girardi aren’t immediately trusting of an uninvited visitor to the dugout has merit. In 2002, two fans ran onto the field and attacked Tom Gamboa, then the Royals’ first base coach. One of the two was in possession of a knife. Typically, fans that trespass are drunk and want attention, but to echo McCann’s sentiment, you never know.