Joey Votto hit a home run very hard and very far

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According to ESPN’s Home Run Tracker, there have only been eight other home runs hit this year that went as far as the 470-foot blast Reds first baseman Joey Votto hit this afternoon against Brewers reliever Michael Blazek. Shin-Soo Choo had reached with a one-out walk and remained on first as Votto came to the plate with two outs. After working the count to 3-1, seeing only 90-95 MPH fastballs from Blazek, Votto crushed a 95 inside fastball down the right field line.

Rather than run, Votto knew he had hit the ball well enough that the only outcomes were home run or foul ball. As the ball began its descent, Votto contorted his body as if to will it to stay fair. The ball struck the foul pole near the top. The blast was officially estimated at 470 feet, Votto’s 23rd of the season. He now has a .928 OPS, good for eighth-best in all of baseball.

The video doesn’t really do the home run justice because the cameras couldn’t actually capture the flight path of the ball.

The Reds won 7-3 behind a quality start from Homer Bailey, who allowed three runs over seven innings. Aroldis Chapman was called on in the eighth and completed the four-out save, getting all four of the outs on strikeouts. The 84-65 Reds temporarily improve to three games behind the first-place Cardinals, and bolster their lead for the second National League Wild Card slot to five games over the red-hot Nationals.

Each owner will get at least $50 million in early 2018 from the sale of BAMTech

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Earlier this year Disney agreed to purchase the majority stake in BAMTech, the digital media company spun off from MLB Advanced Media. We know it as the source of the technology for MLB.tv and MLB.com, but it’s far more wide-ranging than that now. At present it powers streaming for MLB, HBO, NHL, WWE, and, eventually, will power Disney’s and ESPN’s upcoming streaming services.

The company was started by an investment from baseball’s 30 owners, so they’re getting a big payout as a result of the acquisition. Earlier this morning Jim Bowden dropped this regarding how much of that payout is in the offing in the short term:

That’s probably on the low end, actually. Some people I’ve spoken to who are familiar with the acquisition say the figure is more like $68 million in Q1 of 2018.

Good for the owners! It was a savvy, forward-thinking investment that, in the past, baseball owners might not have made. Bud Selig, Bob Bowman and others deserve credit for convincing the Jeff Lorias and Jerry Reinsdorfs of the world to think big and long term. It’s money out of the sky, raining down upon the owner of your baseball team for, basically, doing nothing.

Money which should be remembered when your buddy complains about a relief pitcher getting $6 million for only pitching 65 innings. Money which should be remembered when your team’s GM says that he has to cut back on payroll in the coming year.