Joey Votto hit a home run very hard and very far

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According to ESPN’s Home Run Tracker, there have only been eight other home runs hit this year that went as far as the 470-foot blast Reds first baseman Joey Votto hit this afternoon against Brewers reliever Michael Blazek. Shin-Soo Choo had reached with a one-out walk and remained on first as Votto came to the plate with two outs. After working the count to 3-1, seeing only 90-95 MPH fastballs from Blazek, Votto crushed a 95 inside fastball down the right field line.

Rather than run, Votto knew he had hit the ball well enough that the only outcomes were home run or foul ball. As the ball began its descent, Votto contorted his body as if to will it to stay fair. The ball struck the foul pole near the top. The blast was officially estimated at 470 feet, Votto’s 23rd of the season. He now has a .928 OPS, good for eighth-best in all of baseball.

The video doesn’t really do the home run justice because the cameras couldn’t actually capture the flight path of the ball.

The Reds won 7-3 behind a quality start from Homer Bailey, who allowed three runs over seven innings. Aroldis Chapman was called on in the eighth and completed the four-out save, getting all four of the outs on strikeouts. The 84-65 Reds temporarily improve to three games behind the first-place Cardinals, and bolster their lead for the second National League Wild Card slot to five games over the red-hot Nationals.

Javier Baez, D.J. LeMahieu have disagreement about sign-stealing

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Fellow second basemen Javier Baez of the Cubs and D.J. LeMahieu of the Rockies got into a disagreement in the top of the third inning of Sunday’s game at Coors Field over sign-stealing.

LeMahieu reached on a fielder’s choice ground out, then advanced to second base on Charlie Blackmon‘s single. While Nolan Arenado and Trevor Story were batting, Baez was concerned that LeMahieu was relaying the Cubs’ signs to his teammates. Baez decided to stand in front of LeMahieu to block any information he might have been giving to Arenado and Story. LeMahieu got irritated and the two jawed at each other for a bit. Umpires Vic Carapazza and Greg Gibson had to intervene to tell Baez to knock it off.

There has always been a back-and-forth with alleged sign-stealing. As long as teams aren’t using technology to steal signs, it’s fair game for players to relay information to their teammates about the opposing team’s signs. Last year, MLB determined the Red Sox went against the rules and used technology — an Apple watch in this case — to steal signs from the Yankees. Other teams in the past have been accused of using binoculars from the bullpen to steal signs. In this particular case with Baez and LeMahieu, there was no foul play going on, just Baez trying to make the Rockies cede what he perceived to be their slight competitive advantage.

The Cubs went on to beat the Rockies 9-7 on Sunday.