Orioles rookie Henry Urrutia isn’t allowed into Canada

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Henry Urrutia didn’t travel with the Orioles for their road trip to Toronto that begins tonight because the Cuban defector can’t get into Canada due to immigration issues.

Instead he’ll head to Florida to work out at the Orioles’ spring training complex and Rich Dubroff of CSNBaltimore.com reports that the team may decide to simply shut him down for the season. “I alerted him to the fact that it could go either way so he didn’t take three changes of clothes down there,” manager Buck Showalter told Dubroff.

Urrutia initially got a July call-up after hitting .365 at Triple-A, but struggled and was sent back to the minors. He returned when rosters expanded on September 1, but has started just once since then as Showalter has gone with veterans Danny Valencia and Wilson Betemit in the designated hitter spot.

No one pounds the zone anymore

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“Work fast and throw strikes” has long been the top conventional wisdom for those preaching pitching success. The “work fast” part of that has increasingly gone by the wayside, however, as pitchers take more and more time to throw pitches in an effort to max out their effort and, thus, their velocity with each pitch.

Now, as Ben Lindbergh of The Ringer reports, the “throw strikes” part of it is going out of style too:

Pitchers are throwing fewer pitches inside the strike zone than ever previously recorded . . . A decade ago, more than half of all pitches ended up in the strike zone. Today, that rate has fallen below 47 percent.

There are a couple of reasons for this. Most notable among them, Lindbergh says, being pitchers’ increasing reliance on curves, sliders and splitters as primary pitches, with said pitches not being in the zone by design. Lindbergh doesn’t mention it, but I’d guess that an increased emphasis on catchers’ framing plays a role too, with teams increasingly selecting for catchers who can turn balls that are actually out of the zone into strikes. If you have one of those beasts, why bother throwing something directly over the plate?

There is an unintended downside to all of this: a lack of action. As Lindbergh notes — and as you’ve not doubt noticed while watching games — there are more walks and strikeouts, there is more weak contact from guys chasing bad pitches and, as a result, games and at bats are going longer.

As always, such insights are interesting. As is so often the case these days, however, such insights serve as an unpleasant reminder of why the on-field product is so unsatisfying in so many ways in recent years.