Boston Red Sox  v Tampa Bay Rays

And That Happened: Tuesday’s scores and highlights


Red Sox 2, Rays 0: Welcome back Clay Buchholz. It’s like you never left. Or at least the early-season version of you never left. Five shutout innings with six strikeouts before making way for a bullpen that was just as stingy. The Red Sox lead in the East is 8.5 games.

Padres 8, Phillies 2: Tyler Cloyd was smacked around for seven runs on nine hits in four innings. Meanwhile, Andrew Cashner limited the Phillies to two runs on four hits and a walk.

Yankees 7, Orioles 5: Homers: Chris Davis with his 49th but Alfonso Soriano had two and Mark Reynolds added one to help the Yankees keep pace in the wild card. Injuries:  Alex Rodriguez tweaked his hamstring, Austin Romine got a concussion and Ivan Nova left early with a sore right triceps. The Bombers limped all season and are now limping to the finish line.

Cubs 9, Reds 1: Edwin Jackson allowed one run in seven innings and hit a homer. Wellington Castillo hit two. I guess you can say the Cubs were [removes sunglasses] … battery powered. [Yeeeeeeahhhhh!!!]

Royals 6, Indians 3: The Indians blew their chance to move within a half game of Tampa Bay in the wild card as they manage nine hits off Mark Jeremy Guthrie (bah, I’m old) but also hit into three double plays behind him. It was the first Royals win in Cleveland in six tries.

Nationals 6, Mets 3: A homer and two doubles for Jayson Werth as the Nats win their fourth in a row. Their run differential is finally at zero. Progress, albeit probably too late.

Angels 12, Blue Jays 6: Five hits — four for extra bases — and five runs scored for Mark Trumbo. Josh Hamilton went 3 for 5 with four RBIs himself.

Braves 4, Marlins 3: Julio Teheran struggled early after a long layoff but settled down. The Braves won this on a walkoff rundown: Craig Kimbrel threw a wild pitch, Marlins pinch-runner Jake Marisnick tried to advance to third, but the ball rebounded right back to Brian McCann who threw Marisnick out. Tough break, kid.

Cardinals 4, Brewers 2: Four wins in a row for the Cards. Wily Peralta took a no-hitter into the sixth but Matt Holliday broke it up with a homer. Shelby Miller continued his mastery of the Brewers. He’s 3-0 with a 1.08 ERA in four starts against Milwaukee this year.

Pirates 5, Rangers 4: Pittsburgh keeps pace. Francisco Liriano picks up his 16th win and Andrew McCutchen drives in three. A lot of folks around Pittsburgh thought the Pirates would have a lot of trouble heading into Texas, but so far so good.

Dodgers 5, Diamondbacks 3: Pinch hit walkoff homer for Scott Van Slyke in the 11th. Five straight wins by the Dodgers over the Dbacks. That’s how you put an end to the early-season rivalry between the two. And how you win the division with authority. L.A.’s magic number is six.

Tigers 9, White Sox 1: The girlfriend saw it was Rick Porcello pitching, said “eh, Porcello always struggles in Chicago,” and changed the channel to an old “Frasier” episode. It was from 1994. Frasier had an old 386 computer. I realized that watching a 1994 episode of “Frasier” now is like me watching old “Hogan’s Heroes” or “Andy Griffith” episodes when I was in junior high school. The lesson: I’m old. Oh, and Rick Porcello tossed a complete game so it was totally unnecessary to watch “Frasier” anyway. Even though, dudes, it holds up.

Rockies 9, Giants 8: Two homers for Michael Cuddyer, including the tie-breaker in the ninth off Sergio Romo. Cuddyer is now hitting .330 and has a great shot at a batting title. Hunter Pence, meanwhile, drove in six. Given that the Giants scored four runs off Jorge De La Rosa in the first two innings you figured they’d cruise. But a true fact: they play nine innings in baseball.

Twins 4, Athletics 3: Two homers was quite the trend last night. Josh Willingham did it here. The A’s fail to put some distance between them and Texas.

Astros 13, Mariners 2: Houston scored six times in the first three innings then seven times in the final three. Nice bookends.

David Ortiz and Kris Bryant win 2016 Hank Aaron Awards

CLEVELAND, OH - OCTOBER 26:  (L-R) Kris Bryant #17 of the Chicago Cubs, Major League Baseball Hall of Famer 2016 Hank Aaron, Commissioner of Baseball Rob Manfred and David Ortiz #34 of the Boston Red Sox pose during the Hank Aaron Award ceremony prior to Game Two of the 2016 World Series between the Chicago Cubs and the Cleveland Indians at Progressive Field on October 26, 2016 in Cleveland, Ohio.  (Photo by Jason Miller/Getty Images)
Jason Miller/Getty Images
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Major League Baseball announced on Wednesday that former Red Sox DH David Ortiz and Cubs third baseman Kris Bryant won the 2016 Hank Aaron Award in their respective leagues.

Ortiz, 40, flourished in his final season, batting .315/.401/.620 with 38 home runs and 127 RBI in 626 plate appearances during the regular season. His .620 slugging percentage, 1.021 OPS, and 48 doubles led the majors while his 127 RBI led the American League. Ortiz also won the Hank Aaron Award back in 2005.

Bryant, 24, is the likely winner of the National League Most Valuable Player Award as well. He hit .292/.385/.554 with 39 home runs and 102 RBI over 699 plate appearances. He also led the league by scoring 121 runs. Bryant is the first Cub to win the Hank Aaron Award since Aramis Ramirez in 2008.

Last year’s winners in the AL and NL, respectively, were Josh Donaldson and Bryce Harper.

Alex Rodriguez is taking his analyst role quite seriously

NEW YORK, NY - AUGUST 12: Alex Rodriguez #13 of the New York Yankees answers question in a press conference after the game against the Tampa Bay Rays at Yankee Stadium on August 12, 2016 in New York City. (Photo by Drew Hallowell/Getty Images)
Drew Hallowell/Getty Images

If you’ve happened to catch any of the coverage of the 2016 postseason on Fox and FS1, you’ve heard former Yankees DH Alex Rodriguez as part of an analyst panel with host Kevin Burkhardt and former major leaguers Pete Rose and Frank Thomas. Rodriguez has drawn rave reviews not just for passing a rather low bar we set for former athletes-turned-commentators, but because he’s adding real insight drawn both from his playing days and from doing research.

Indeed, Rodriguez is taking his new job as an analyst quite seriously, Newsday’s Neil Best reports. Bardia Shah-Rais, the VP of production for Fox, said of Rodriguez, “This is not a hobby for him. It’s not a parachute in. He’s invested. If we have a noon meeting, he’s there at 11:30 a.m. He’s emailing story ideas in the morning. He wants research. He’s almost all-in to the point where it’s annoying.”

Rose also praised Rodriguez, saying, “You’ve never been around a guy who prepares more than Alex does. Alex does his homework. He knows the game. He understands players. He’s into the deal . . . Frank does a great job in preparation, too. I’m the only one that don’t prepare as much as these two guys. I don’t know if that’s because I can’t write or what it is. But these guys do their homework and they ask questions and they ask the right questions and then you put that in with our experience, all the things we’ve been through and how good we get along with each other, that’s why it shows up on the TV.”

Rodriguez, who hasn’t officially retired despite not having played since the Yankees released him in mid-August, wouldn’t commit to more TV work beyond this year’s postseason.