Jamie McCourt gets smacked down in her attempt to get more of that Dodgers money

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Back in October 2011 Jamie and Frank McCourt settled their dispute over ownership of the Dodgers. At the time it seemed like Jamie got a fairly decent deal. She got $131 million out of it despite the fact that her claims to true joint ownership of the team were somewhat tenuous and despite the fact that, at the time, all of Frank’s debts and the Dodgers’ debts — something on the order of $800 million worth — looked like a sale of the team wouldn’t bring anything close to a windfall. Heck, McCourt looked like he’d maybe — maybe — break even.

But then something hilarious happened: Frank sold the team for $2.15 billion, which was way, way more than Jamie or most other folks figured he’d get for it. When that happened Jamie went running back to court to try to reopen the settlement, claiming fraud and all sorts of other things, but really just wanting a bigger piece of all of that Dodgers money.

The judge ruled yesterday. Sorry, Jamie. From Bill Shaikin at the Los Angeles Times:

Jamie McCourt asked that the divorce settlement be thrown out, alleging Frank McCourt misled her about the value of the team and its assets. In his ruling, Gordon said there was “no credible evidence” to support those allegations and noted that Jamie McCourt had been involved in team and RSN valuations in her capacity as a high-ranking Dodgers executive.

When you think about it, Jamie did herself in. For a couple of years during the divorce fight, Jamie portrayed herself as a true co-owner and a wrongfully-fired Dodgers executive. She even argued for a long time that she actually wanted ownership of the Dodgers when it was all settled, not just a cashout. Then, to turn around and say that she was a mere babe in the woods when it came to complicated things like baseball teams and TV rights and that bad old Frank misled her about it all is pretty much the definition of chutzpah.

Frank McCourt is not my idea of a hero, but gee whiz, he’s got nothing on Jamie in the “can you believe this?” department.

Yankees GM Brian Cashman not considering demoting struggling Greg Bird

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Yankees first baseman Greg Bird gave his team tons of confidence to hand him the everyday job at first base to start the 2017 regular season, batting .451/.556/1.098 with eight home runs in 51 spring at-bats. But he’s followed that up by hitting .107/.254/.214 through the first month of the regular season.

GM Brian Cashman doesn’t have any intent to demote Bird back to Triple-A Scranton/Wilkes-Barre, MLB.com’s Bryan Hoch reports. Cashman said, “It’s not even an option for me in my mind right now, at all.”

Bird didn’t start Sunday’s game against the Orioles, a 7-4 loss in 11 innings. Lefty Wade Miley started for the Orioles, prompting manager Joe Girardi to put Chris Carter into the lineup at first base. If Bird isn’t able to figure things out, Carter might have an increased role on the team.

Chris Archer threw behind Jose Bautista

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Rays starter Chris Archer threw his first pitch to Blue Jays outfielder Jose Bautista behind the slugger’s back with one out in the first inning of Sunday afternoon’s game in Toronto. Bautista and Archer then had a staredown. Home plate umpire Jim Wolf issued warnings to both teams. Bautista ultimately flied out to right field and he appeared to have a quick word with Archer on his way back to the dugout.

Archer could have been exacting revenge — euphemistically known as “protecting his teammate” — because Jays reliever Joe Biagini hit Rays outfielder Steven Souza in the seventh inning of Saturday’s game. Souza was forced to leave the game and underwent an X-ray, which came back negative. He was held out of Sunday’s lineup. Biagini’s pitch did not appear to be intentional.

The Jays won Sunday’s contest 3-1 with no further incident. The two clubs meet again in Tampa for a three-game series starting on May 5, so we’ll see if Sunday was the last of the bad blood between them.