Jamie McCourt gets smacked down in her attempt to get more of that Dodgers money

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Back in October 2011 Jamie and Frank McCourt settled their dispute over ownership of the Dodgers. At the time it seemed like Jamie got a fairly decent deal. She got $131 million out of it despite the fact that her claims to true joint ownership of the team were somewhat tenuous and despite the fact that, at the time, all of Frank’s debts and the Dodgers’ debts — something on the order of $800 million worth — looked like a sale of the team wouldn’t bring anything close to a windfall. Heck, McCourt looked like he’d maybe — maybe — break even.

But then something hilarious happened: Frank sold the team for $2.15 billion, which was way, way more than Jamie or most other folks figured he’d get for it. When that happened Jamie went running back to court to try to reopen the settlement, claiming fraud and all sorts of other things, but really just wanting a bigger piece of all of that Dodgers money.

The judge ruled yesterday. Sorry, Jamie. From Bill Shaikin at the Los Angeles Times:

Jamie McCourt asked that the divorce settlement be thrown out, alleging Frank McCourt misled her about the value of the team and its assets. In his ruling, Gordon said there was “no credible evidence” to support those allegations and noted that Jamie McCourt had been involved in team and RSN valuations in her capacity as a high-ranking Dodgers executive.

When you think about it, Jamie did herself in. For a couple of years during the divorce fight, Jamie portrayed herself as a true co-owner and a wrongfully-fired Dodgers executive. She even argued for a long time that she actually wanted ownership of the Dodgers when it was all settled, not just a cashout. Then, to turn around and say that she was a mere babe in the woods when it came to complicated things like baseball teams and TV rights and that bad old Frank misled her about it all is pretty much the definition of chutzpah.

Frank McCourt is not my idea of a hero, but gee whiz, he’s got nothing on Jamie in the “can you believe this?” department.

Jered Weaver announces his retirement

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Jered Weaver, a 12-year big league veteran and a three-time All-Star, has announced his retirement.

Weaver was struggling mightily with the Padres this year, going 0-5 in nine starts and posting a 7.44 ERA,, a 2.6 BB/9 and 4.9 K/9 ratio over 42.1 innings. He hadn’t posted a sub-4.00 ERA since 2014 and his velocity had, quite famously, sunk into the low 80s and even high 70s at times in recent seasons. A spate of physical setbacks contributed to that, with a hip inflammation ailing him this season and nerve issues in his neck and back afflicting him for the past few years.

But even if his recent seasons have been less-than-memorable, it’s worth remembering that he was, for a time, one of baseball’s best pitchers. He posted a record of 131-69 with a 3.28 ERA in his first 9 seasons, leading the American League in strikeouts in 2010 and leading the circuit in wins in 2012 and 2014. He likewise led the league in WHIP and hits allowed per nine innings in 2012.

He finishes his career with a record of 150-98, an ERA of 3.63 (ERA+ of 111) and a K/BB ratio of 1,621/551 in 2,067.1 innings. He pitched in four American League Division Series and the 2009 ALCS, posting a 2.67 ERA in seven playoff games pitched.

Happy trails, Jered. A first-ballot induction into the Hall of He Was Really Dang Good, Even if We Forgot About It For A While is in your future.

The Jose Fernandez statue may be in jeopardy

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Last November it was reported that the Marlins planned to build a memorial for Jose Fernandez, likely including a statue. The effort was said to be a pet project of the Marlins owner, Jeff Loria, who was close with Fernandez.

Today the Miami Herald reports, however, that those plans are in limbo due to the sale of the team:

The planned statue to honor Jose Fernandez, which was departing owner Jeffrey Loria’s idea, is now very much in question because it will not be erected before Bruce Sherman and Derek Jeter take over, and it will ultimately be the new owners’ call. That matter has not yet been discussed, with the sale agreed to only in the past few days.

There’s nothing in the report suggesting that they’re opposed to the statue — it’s possible this was placed in the Herald by people close to the new group in order to test the waters — but there always was the sense that the idea was something of a priority for Loria personally. One wonders how much momentum it will have once he’s gone.

Then, of course, there’s the fact that Fernandez was eventually found to have been under the influence of alcohol and cocaine and was behind the wheel of the boat at the time of the accident that claimed his life and the life of two others, making any memorial to him suspect in the eyes of some people.

Thankfully we don’t spend a lot of time and energy discussing the ethics of statues in this country, so I’m sure it’ll have no bearing on the matter.