Ike Davis will not be non-tendered by the Mets

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Ike Davis is an interesting problem. He started the year in the deepest of swoons and it got so bad that the Mets sent him back to Triple-A to figure stuff out.  There he did, and and after returning from Triple-A in early July he hit .267 with an .872 OPS in 48 games, posting a fantastic .429 on-base percentage with more walks (38) than strikeouts (35). Just a total turnaround. Then, man, he strained his oblique and got shut down for the year.

Quite a roller-coaster. But also a bit of a problem. For you see, Davis is arbitration-eligible and that means a pretty decent raise over his current $3.15 million salary. Which is great if he’s the Ike Davis of the second half of 2013 or the Ike Davis of 2012. Not so great if he’s the first-half Davis. And how the injury plays into it all is another variable.

Of course whether to tender Davis a contract is not my decision to make, it’s Sandy Alderson’s. For what it’s worth, Adam Rubin of ESPN reports that there is “no consideration being given” to non-tendering Davis.

I think that’s the right call. There’s no guarantee that Davis won’t continue to struggle for half-seasons at a time, but there’s also too much potential there — and no better option hanging around — to consider a non-tender. It’s hard to envision a successful Mets team any time soon that doesn’t feature an effective Ike Davis. There’s no guarantee that the Mets will get that, but they have to stick with him.

The Tigers decline Anibal Sanchez’s 2018 option

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From the “this does not surprise us in the very least” department, Tigers GM Al Avila announced today that the club is declining its $16 million option on right-hander Anibal Sanchez.

Sanchez had a terrible year in 2017, going 3-7 with a 6.41 ERA in 2017. That’s a long slide down from his 2013 season, in which he won the AL ERA title, going 14-8 and posting an ERA of 2.57 in the first year of his five-year, $80 million deal. Since then he’s gone 28-35 with a 5.15 ERA. He never started 30 games or more over the course of the contract.

The declination of the option does come with a nice parting gift for Sanchez: a $5 million buyout. Which is pretty dang high for a buyout, but that’s how the Tigers rolled three or four years ago.