Nick Castellanos collects first major league hit

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It wasn’t the prettiest — and actually should have been ruled an error — but Tigers top prospect Nick Castellanos registered his first career major league hit Saturday in the Tigers’ 4-3 loss to the Royals.

Castellanos trickled a slow-roller off the end of his bat to Royals second baseman Emilio Bonifacio, who made a nice charging play and flung the ball over to first baseman Eric Hosmer. But Hosmer could not handle the throw and Castellanos was ruled safe with an infield single. Here’s the video.

Castellanos made it to second base on a Ramon Santiago walk, to third base on an Austin Jackson walk and then scored when Miguel Cabrera drew a bases-loaded base-on-balls.

The run — however easily he came about it — was also a career-first for Castellanos.

Castellanos got called up to the major leagues on September 1 after performing well enough this summer at the Triple-A level. The talented 21-year-old corner outfielder was a .303/.359/.445 hitter in four-plus minor league seasons and figures to have a starting job in Detroit on Opening Day next spring.

The Hall of Fame rejected the BBWAA vote to make ballots public

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Last year, at the Winter Meetings, the BBWAA voted overwhelmingly to make Hall of Fame ballots public beginning with this year’s election. Their as a long-demanded one, and it served to make a process that has often frustrated fans — and many voters — more transparent.

Mark Feinsand of MLB.com tweeted a few minutes ago, however, that at some point since last December, the Hall of Fame rejected the BBWAA’s vote. Writer may continue to release their own ballots, but their votes will not automatically be made public.

I don’t know what the rationale could possibly be for the Hall of Fame. If I had to guess, I’d say that the less-active BBWAA voters who either voted against that change or who weren’t present for it because they don’t go to the Winter Meetings complained about it. It’s likewise possible that the Hall simply doesn’t want anyone talking about the votes and voters so as not to take attention away from the honorees and the institution, but that train left the station years ago. If the Hall doesn’t want people talking about votes and voters, they’d have to change the whole thing to some star chamber kind of process in which the voters themselves aren’t even known and no one discusses it publicly until after the results are released.

Oh well. There’s a lot the Hall of Fame does that doesn’t make a ton of sense. Add this to the list.