Derek Jeter exits with soreness near ankle

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When Derek Jeter was pulled for a pinch-runner in the sixth inning Saturday, the hope was the Yankees were just preserving him in a 12-6 game. However, FOXSports.com’s Ken Rosenthal reported three innings later that Jeter was taken out due to soreness around the ankle he broke in the postseason last year.

Jeter singled in a run in his final at-bat Saturday. The half-inning before, he fielded a grounder at short a little awkwardly and threw wide of the bag at first, giving Jonny Gomes a single (they don’t call errors on Jeter at Yankee Stadium).

Jeter was back at shortstop today after DHing last night. His status going forward is very uncertain at this point. Maybe he can DH, but it’s not like he’s much of an asset there. The Yankees would prefer to continue to rotate Alfonso Soriano and Curtis Granderson in that spot. Jeter has very little range at shortstop with his legs giving him so much trouble — he suffered setbacks with his quad and calf as he rehabbed the ankle — but given that the alternative is Eduardo Nunez, Jeter might still be the team’s best option when he’s able to play.

Joe Maddon: “I have a defensive foot fetish.”

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The Cubs’ defense — or lack thereof this year — has been a topic of conversation as it could help explain why the team hasn’t played at the elite level it played at last year.

Manager Joe Maddon tried to go into detail about that but ended up channeling his inner Rex Ryan. Via CSN Chicago’s Patrick Mooney.

Well then.

The Nationals have scored 62 runs during four Joe Ross starts

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If, in the future, Joe Ross ever complains about a lack of run support, point to his first four starts of the 2017 season.

Ross started on April 19 in Atlanta against the Braves, on April 25 in Colorado against the Rockies, on April 30 at home against the Mets, and on May 23 at home against the Mariners. In those games, the Nats’ offense scored 14, 15, 23, and 10 runs respectively for a total of 62 runs, or an average of 15.5 per start. Ross was the pitcher of record for seven, eight, 10, and 10 runs for a total of 35 runs (8.75 runs per start), which would still make him the major league leader in run support by that restrictive standard.

Among qualified starters — Ross did not qualify — entering Tuesday’s action, the Rockies’ Antonio Senzatela led the way according to ESPN, averaging 7.11 runs of support in nine starts. The Rockies scored double-digit runs in only three of those starts, oddly enough.

Per the Nationals, the 62 runs of support for Ross is a major league record in a pitcher’s first four starts of a season.