Adam Wainwright pitches the Cardinals back into first place with gem against the Pirates

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The NL Central continues to provide drama as September rages on, with the Cardinals and Pirates waging battle for first place in the division this weekend. Adam Wainwright brought his A-game with his team entering the night 0.5 games out of first place, as he shut the Pirates out over seven innings of work. He allowed just two hits and two walks while striking out eight, lowering his ERA to 3.03 in the process.

The Cardinal offense got to Pirates starter Jeff Locke in the fourth, scoring twice on a David Freese sacrifice fly and a Pete Kozma RBI single. They would tack on a run in each of the fifth, sixth, and eighth innings as well, more than enough support for their ace. Trevor Rosenthal, Seth Maness, and Randy Choate teamed up for the final six outs of the game to lock up the 5-0 victory, pushing the Cardinals 0.5 games ahead of the Pirates at the top of the NL Central.

The Hall of Fame rejected the BBWAA vote to make ballots public

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Last year, at the Winter Meetings, the BBWAA voted overwhelmingly to make Hall of Fame ballots public beginning with this year’s election. Their decision was a long-demanded one, and it served to make a process that has often frustrated fans — and many voters — more transparent.

Mark Feinsand of MLB.com tweeted a few minutes ago, however, that at some point since last December, the Hall of Fame rejected the BBWAA’s vote. Writers may continue to release their own ballots, but their votes will not automatically be made public.

I don’t know what the rationale could possibly be for the Hall of Fame. If I had to guess, I’d say that the less-active BBWAA voters who either voted against that change or who weren’t present for it because they don’t go to the Winter Meetings complained about it. It’s likewise possible that the Hall simply doesn’t want anyone talking about the votes and voters so as not to take attention away from the honorees and the institution, but that train left the station years ago. If the Hall doesn’t want people talking about votes and voters, they’d have to change the whole thing to some star chamber kind of process in which the voters themselves aren’t even known and no one discusses it publicly until after the results are released.

Oh well. There’s a lot the Hall of Fame does that doesn’t make a ton of sense. Add this to the list.