And That Happened: Thursday’s scores and highlights

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Orioles 3, White Sox 1: The Orioles win and, frankly, I’m going to credit playing at home. Yep, nothing like a home game. Makes all the difference.

And if you think for a minute I’m irrationally beating this into the ground, go take a gander at the NFL Industrial Complex’s collective and concerted moaning and complaining about last night’s Ravens game going down in Denver. Both official NFL PR people (more than one) and multiple NFL reporters and sycophants parroted talking points about the Orioles and Major League Baseball being intransigent or “making a stink” when it was, in fact, the NFL which made the stink and when, in fact, the Orioles game was scheduled first. All while conveniently ignoring that the NFL has never been willing to budge an inch for baseball when the situation was reversed. Also note that the AP photographers at the Orioles game last night took multiple pictures of empty seats at Camden Yards and the empty Ravens stadium next door. If you think for a second that word didn’t come down from NFL to their obedient scribes to play up “Orioles Mean!” talk in response to fan inquiries about why the Ravens weren’t opening at home, and if you didn’t think that the didn’t all obey, you’re nuts.

Red Sox 9, Yankees 8: It’s like Game 4 of the 2004 ALCS as seen through blurry glasses and with bad fundamental play around the edges. The Red Sox found themselves down to their last out with Mariano Rivera on the hill. Then a single, a pinch runner stealing a base and cruising to third when the catcher’s throw went skipping into the outfield followed by a Stephen Drew and things were all tied up. The tenth inning was spiked with a probably bad check-swing call from none other than Joe West — question: will check swings be reviewable next year? — and with new life Shane Victorino knocked in Jacoby Ellsbury.

Reds 6, Cardinals 2: Two homers for Todd Frazier as the Reds take three of four from St. Louis. It was the first series win for the Reds over the Cards in eight tries. The Reds are now a game and a half behind St. Louis for second place, three behind the Pirates.

Royals 7, Mariners 6: Big sloppy game won in large thanks to a big game from big Billy Butler, who went 5 for 5. Mike Moustakas had the 13th inning walkoff homer, however. The Royals had their chance to win it in the ninth as they led 6-5 with two outs before Raul Ibanez homered off Greg Holland to tie it. Holland had been pretty automatic before that, but Ibanez has those Lazarus Pits in his basement and stuff, so you know.

Diamondbacks 4, Giants 2: Interesting mostly because, with this loss, the Giants could be eliminated from NL West contention tonight. All that need happen is for the Dodgers to win in Cincinnati and the Giants to lose against the Dbacks. That’s technical elimination. The Giants have been effectively eliminated for months now.

Astros 3, Athletics 2: Brad Peacock took a shutout into the eighth inning, the A’s mounted a rally, but it fell short and they fell out of first place in the West. Speaking of Peacock, you should totally go read this story about the making of and history of the movie “Clue.” Which is an all-time guilty pleasure of mine. When people say they don’t like it it-it- the f – it -flam – flames. Flames, on the side of my face, breathing-breathl- heaving breaths. Heaving breaths… Heathing…

Angels 6, Rays 2: The Angels knocked 11 hits off of David Price and the Rays lost for the ninth time in their last 12 games. They maintain their 2.5 game lead over the Yankees for the wild card but, boy howdy, are they skidding.

Watch: Mike Trout ties MLB record with his 25th home run

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It was only a matter of time before Mike Trout courted another all-time record, and on Saturday, he found himself in elite company with his 25th and 26th home runs of the season. He put the Angels on the board with a 429-foot blast in the first inning, depositing an 0-1 fastball from the Orioles’ Kevin Gausman into the left field bleachers:

In the third inning, with the Angels up 2-1, Trout returned to tack on another insurance run. He targeted Gausman’s slider for his second solo shot of the evening and cleared the center field fence with a 418-footer to bring his total to 26 home runs on the year.

Trout has mashed at a staggering .339/.471/.596 clip since his return from the disabled list last month, and Saturday’s totals helped mark his sixth consecutive season with at least 25 home runs. That’s a record few have matched before their age-26 season; in fact, only Hall of Fame sluggers Eddie Mathews and Frank Robinson have ever pulled it off.

Assuming he continues to rake in hits and plate appearances over the last six weeks of the regular season — and there’s nothing to indicate that he won’t — Trout is in line to join elite company of a different kind. The 26-year-old entered Saturday’s game with a 206 OPS+ (park-adjusted on-base plus slugging). According to MLB.com’s Matt Kelly, that means Trout’s hitting at a better clip than the average Major League player by a full 106 percent. Should he finish the year with a 200 OPS+ and 502 plate appearances or better, he’ll be the first player to do so since Barry Bonds obliterated the competition with his 263 OPS+ in 2004.

Blue Jays acquire Tom Koehler from Marlins

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The Blue Jays acquired right-hander Tom Koehler from the Marlins in exchange for minor league right-hander Osman Gutierrez and cash considerations, the clubs announced Saturday. Koehler is in his sixth year with the Marlins and stands to make $5.75 million in 2017. He’ll be arbitration eligible in 2018 and is set to enter free agency by 2019.

The 31-year-old right-hander struggled to a 7.92 ERA, 4.7 BB/9 and 7.1 SO/9 over 55 2/3 innings with Miami in 2017. He was optioned to Triple-A New Orleans in late July, where he rebounded with a 1-1 record in seven starts and whittled his ERA down to a 1.67 mark. The Blue Jays have yet to establish Koehler’s role within their organization, but are hoping to see a turnaround from the righty when he breaks back into the big leagues.

Gutierrez, 22, was assigned to Single-A Greensboro on Saturday. He has yet to find his footing in the minors, and exited a 78-inning stint with Single-A Lansing after racking up a career-worst 7.85 ERA and 8.2 SO/9. His lack of control is particularly alarming, with a 6.2 BB/9 that dwarfs the 2.0+ BB/9 of seasons past, but he still has plenty of time to figure out his mechanics before reaching the Show.