B.J. Upton goes 4-for-6, helps Braves walk off against the Marlins

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After a hot streak to begin the month of August, Braves outfielder B.J. Upton had fallen into another slump again, hitting just .100 in his last 44 plate appearances entering tonight’s game against the Marlins. Upton was on fire all night against Marlins starter Jacob Turner and the bullpen, though, knocking four hits including a game-tying two-run home run in the sixth inning and a walk-off RBI single off of reliever Ryan Webb in the 11th.

Because of the clutch hitting, FanGraphs credited him with .758 Win Percent Added, a Sabermetric statistic that tells you how much a player’s contributed to a team’s chance of winning. In this case, Upton was responsible for about 76 percent. Per Baseball Reference, Upton’s performance is the 11th-most valuable of the season.

Upton also boosted his batting average to .195, the highest it has been since August 9. He hasn’t been over the Mendoza line at any point during the season.

Chris Johnson also went 4-for-6 on the night, increasing his batting average from .326 to .331, retaking the batting title lead from Cardinals catcher Yadier Molina.

The Angels were the first team to use up all of their mound visits

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Last night’s Angels-Astros game was a long affair with a bunch of homers and the use of 11 pitchers in all. The Angels used six pitchers and all of that business led to plenty of conferences. Six, in fact, which is their allotment under the new rule capping mound visits. As far as I can tell, that makes the Angels the first team to use up all of their mound visits since the advent of the rule.

Sadly, they did not try to go for a seventh, thereby testing the currently unknown limits of the rule. Umpires have been instructed to not allow additional mound visits, but they cannot issue balls or tackle anyone or anything to enforce it. Presumably, if Maldonado had walked out to talk to Cam Bedrosian about the weather or where he was going to dinner after the game, the home plate umpire would’ve simply done the old Robin Williams English policeman’s bit of yelling “Stop! . . . or I shall yell ‘Stop!’ again!” Maybe a fine would issue later, but we’ll never know.

At least until someone breaks the limit. And we know someone will, right? We should have a betting pool on who does it.