Report: the Pirates acquire Marlon Byrd and John Buck from the Mets

35 Comments

Adam Rubin of ESPN New York reports that the Pirates have acquired outfielder Marlon Byrd and catcher John Buck from the Mets. Earlier in the day it was reported that the two had been placed on waivers and claimed by an unknown team. Now we know. In return the Mets are getting minor leaguer Dilson Herrera and a player to be named later.

Byrd has been something of a revelation for the Mets this year, hitting .285/.330/.518 with 21 homers.  Buck started the year incredibly strong but has since been relegated to backup catching duties as the Mets are giving Travis d’Arnaud a shot to be their everyday catcher.  Neither Buck nor Byrd are under contract beyond this year.  Any hopes that the Mets would hold on to them for a potentially-contending 2014 season were probably dashed with Matt Harvey’s season coming to an end and his 2014 likely being a washout.

For the Pirates, Byrd will represent an offensive infusion for the stretch run as he will likely take the everyday role from Jose Tabata in left. At least assuming he keeps up what he’s been doing. Buck will provide depth as a backup to Russell Martin.  Neither guy is a game-changer, but as the season comes down to the end, every little bit helps.

Derek Jeter wants to get rid of the Marlins’ home run sculpture

Mike Ehrmann/Getty Images
1 Comment

Derek Jeter, part-owner of the Marlins, met with Miami-Dade County mayor Carlos Gimenez on Tuesday afternoon at Marlins Park, Douglas Hanks of the Miami Herald reports. They discussed potentially removing the home run sculpture from the ballpark, something that has been on Jeter’s to-do list since he took over.

Gimenez said of the sculpture, “I just don’t think they’re all that crazy about it. I’m not a fan. We’re looking at it. … We’ll see if anything can be done.”

According to Hanks, the sculpture is public property because it was purchased as part of the Art in Public Places program, which requires art to be installed for the public in county-owned buildings. Michael Spring, the cultural chief for Miami-Dade who was present with Jeter and Gimenez on Tuesday, had previously said that the sculpture was “not moveable” and was “permanently installed” because it was designed “specifically” for Marlins Park. On Tuesday, Spring said, “Anything is possible. But it is pretty complicated. And I wanted the mayor and the Marlins to understand how complicated it really was. We got a good look at it today, and they saw how big it was. There’s hydraulics, there’s plumbing, there’s electricity.”

With Jeter having traded Giancarlo Stanton, Marcell Ozuna, and Dee Gordon this offseason, the home run sculpture is arguably one of the last remaining interesting things about the Marlins in 2018. Naturally, he wants to get rid of it.