Jeff Loria pulled another Jeff Loria move

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This is several days old but I had missed it until I saw Jeff Passan mention it in his latest column.  The original report is from Clark Spencer of the Miami Herald. It shockingly involves Jeff Loria being a petty jerk.

Recall that Tino Martinez resigned as the Marlins hitting coach last month following accusations by some players that he was verbally and physically abusive. Spencer reports that this sat poorly with Loria, who personally hired Martinez. Flash forward to last week when Placido Polanco went to the disabled list. The Marlins front office and coaching staff were unanimous in wanting the team to call up infielder Chris Valaika — who had been hitting like crazy in New Orleans — to to replace Polanco.

Except Valaika was one of the players who had complained about Martinez’s behavior. So, out of spite, Loria personally overruled his baseball people and ordered Gil Velazquez to be called up.

Passan’s column notes that it’s possible that Loria may force out team presidents David Samson and Larry Beinfest. Who, when they’re not being forced to be Loria’s lapdogs are actually pretty good at assembling baseball talent. His team, his prerogative.

But why anyone would choose to work for that guy and how anyone can root for that team while he still owns it is an utter mystery to me.

Aaron Judge set a new postseason strikeout record

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For a few days, it looked like Aaron Judge was finally hitting his stride in the postseason. He was still striking out at a regular clip, piling more and more strikeouts atop the 16 he racked up in the Division Series, but he was mashing, too. He engineered a three-run homer during Game 3 of the Championship Series, followed by another blast and game-tying double in Game 4. His one-out double helped pad a five-run lead in Game 5, while his 425-footer off of Brad Peacock barely made a dent during a 7-1 loss in Game 6. And then Lance McCullers‘ curveball found and fooled him, as it did five of the 14 batters it met in Game 7:

The strikeout was Judge’s first of the evening and 27th since the start of the playoffs. No other major league batter has racked up that many strikeouts in a single postseason, though Alfonso Soriano’s 26-strikeout record in 2003 comes the closest. Within that record, Judge also collected three golden sombreros (four strikeouts in a single game), narrowly avoiding the dreaded platinum sombrero (five strikeouts in a single game).

It’s an unfortunate footnote to a spectacular year for the rookie outfielder, who decimated the competition with 52 home runs and 8.2 fWAR during the regular season and was a pivotal part of the Yankees’ playoff run. Thankfully, the image of McCullers’ curveball darting just under Judge’s bat won’t be the image that sticks with us for years to come. Instead, it’ll look something like this: