Braves beat reporter really wants you to know SABR/SABRE stinks and Freddie Freeman is good

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This morning I saw this tweet from David O’Brien, the Braves beat reporter for the Atlanta Journal Constitution:

Three things: One, the Society for American Baseball Research is SABR and the pretend printer company that was featured as a plotline in “The Office” is SABRE. Two, sabermetrics and SABR are very different things and few SABR members would have much to say about Freddie Freeman because Freddie Freeman did not play in the 1800s. Three, the whole tweet struck me as the beat reporter equivalent of a parent insisting their child is the cutest in the class.

All of which is why I was amused just now when O’Brien posted a second, updated version of his original tweet five hours later:

Well, at least those jerks at the pretend television printer company are off the hook now! Oh, and incidentally: Ultimate Zone Rating, which is the most-cited sabermetric defensive stat, rates Freeman as 1.7 runs above average this season.

Aaron Judge set a new postseason strikeout record

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For a few days, it looked like Aaron Judge was finally hitting his stride in the postseason. He was still striking out at a regular clip, piling more and more strikeouts atop the 16 he racked up in the Division Series, but he was mashing, too. He engineered a three-run homer during Game 3 of the Championship Series, followed by another blast and game-tying double in Game 4. His one-out double helped pad a five-run lead in Game 5, while his 425-footer off of Brad Peacock barely made a dent during a 7-1 loss in Game 6. And then Lance McCullers‘ curveball found and fooled him, as it did five of the 14 batters it met in Game 7:

The strikeout was Judge’s first of the evening and 27th since the start of the playoffs. No other major league batter has racked up that many strikeouts in a single postseason, though Alfonso Soriano’s 26-strikeout record in 2003 comes the closest. Within that record, Judge also collected three golden sombreros (four strikeouts in a single game), narrowly avoiding the dreaded platinum sombrero (five strikeouts in a single game).

It’s an unfortunate footnote to a spectacular year for the rookie outfielder, who decimated the competition with 52 home runs and 8.2 fWAR during the regular season and was a pivotal part of the Yankees’ playoff run. Thankfully, the image of McCullers’ curveball darting just under Judge’s bat won’t be the image that sticks with us for years to come. Instead, it’ll look something like this: