Before the Matt Harvey blame game begins …

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Matt Harvey being shut down with a partially-torn UCL is awful, awful news. I know now the official line is that they will wait and see how it goes, think about rehab over surgery and all of that, but really: when was the last time a pitcher successfully rehabbed a torn-UCL? It seems like they always end up having surgery.

So, as we contemplate being without Matt Harvey for a year — and not to full strength until the beginning of the 2015 season — let’s talk about the blame game. Because you know people will be doing so soon.

Except, I’m struggling to think of who should get blame. We may hear sourced-reports about this later, but I can’t recall anyone with knowledge of Harvey’s health and condition saying that the Mets were mishandling him. Overworking him. Ignoring signs of fatigue.  His workload hasn’t gone up in dramatic fashion from one year to the next (which is part of the somewhat dubious “Verducci Effect” theory). He’s had a handful of outings this season where he began innings after already over 100 pitches and topped 120 a couple of times, but no one ever said that 100 pitches was some magic number. Indeed, smarter thinking these days is that you have to watch pitchers individually for signs of fatigue rather than arbitrarily assigning the same pitch count to a horse like Harvey as you might a slight curveball artist.

No, Harvey getting shut down and likely needing surgery doesn’t appear to be a matter of the Mets abusing Harvey or some awful mechanical flaw. It’s just a matter of pitching living to break your heart. Maybe someday there will be a viable theory that predicts and can help prevent elbow injuries in pitchers, but for now it just feels like chaos and sadness. A chaos and a sadness that seems to have visited Mets pitching prospects in disproportionate fashion over the years.

Astros place Colin Moran on 10-day disabled list with facial fracture

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The Astros placed third baseman Colin Moran on the 10-day disabled list with a facial fracture, the team announced Sunday. Moran sustained both a concussion and a fracture during the sixth inning of Saturday’s 8-4 win against the Orioles, when he was carted off the field after a foul ball struck him in the face near his left eye. An estimated return date has yet to be specified by the club.

Postgame comments from Astros’ manager A.J. Hinch revealed that Moran immediately felt faint after sustaining the injury. Via MLB.com’s Mandy Bell:

He wasn’t feeling very well and he wanted to get off the field, like all players do. Nobody wants to sit down, and as soon as he got up, he thought he was going to pass out, kind of got nauseous,” Hinch said. “So we put him back down and called for the cart.

While Moran was treated at a nearby hospital in Baltimore, he was replaced on the field by pinch-hitter/third baseman Marwin Gonzalez, who finished the at-bat with a three-run home run to give the Astros a late-game lead. Gonzalez won’t be the only one shouldering infield duties in Moran’s absence, however, as the team penciled in Alex Bregman at the hot corner for Sunday’s series finale.

In a corresponding move, the Astros also recalled infielder Tyler White from Triple-A Fresno. White, 26, broke into the big leagues in 2016 with a .217/.286/.378 and eight home runs in 276 PA for the Astros. He’s off to a hot start in Triple-A this season, slashing .299/.371/.517 with 19 homers in his first 408 PA of 2017.

Rays acquire Sergio Romo from Dodgers

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The Rays acquired right-handed reliever Sergio Romo from the Dodgers, the teams announced Saturday night. Tampa Bay manager Kevin Cash hinted that the team was in on Romo during the offseason, but couldn’t quite make a deal happen at the time. The righty reliever was designated for assignment by the Dodgers on Thursday and will net the club cash considerations or a player to be named later.

Romo, 34, struggled to find his footing in his first season with the Dodgers. He left a closing role in San Francisco to play set-up man to established closer Kenley Jansen, and saw mixed results on the mound with a 6.12 ERA, 4.3 BB/9 and 11.2 SO/9 through his first 25 innings of 2017. It’s a far cry from the sub-3.00 ERA he maintained in 2015 and 2016, but the Rays don’t seem to have ruled out a second-half surge just yet.

The veteran right-hander is expected to step into a bullpen that already boasts a solid core of right-handed relievers, including Alex Colome, Brad Boxberger, Erasmo Ramirez, Chase Whitley and Tommy Hunter. According to FOX Sports’ Ken Rosenthal, the Rays were intrigued by Romo’s extensive postseason experience, affordability and hefty strikeout rate, but will likely continue to hunt for additional bullpen depth in the weeks to come.