Daisuke Matsuzaka roughed up by Tigers in Mets debut

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The Indians released Japanese right-handed starter Daisuke Matsuzaka on Tuesday after he posted a 3.92 ERA in 103.1 innings with Triple-A Columbus. The Mets signed him yesterday and immediately inserted him into the rotation to make his debut in Queens against the heavy-hitting Tigers, his first Major League appearance since October 3, 2012.

The Tigers quickly got to Matsuzaka. After Austin Jackson struck out to lead off the first inning, Torii Hunter smashed a solo home run to left inning. Miguel Cabrera and Prince Fielder followed up with singles, but “Dice-K” was able to work his way out of trouble. The Mets got the run back in the bottom half of the first on a Marlon Byrd RBI single.

In the second, Hunter and Cabrera teamed up to blow the game wide open. With runners on first and second and two outs, Hunter hit a ground-rule double, scoring one run. Then Cabrera crushed a three-run home run to left, his 41st of the season, to left field to put the Tigers up 5-1. It was also the 362nd home run of the third baseman’s career, putting him one ahead of Joe DiMaggio and tying him with Todd Helton for 76th all-time.

Matsuzaka calmed down, retiring ten consecutive Tigers after the Cabrera home run. He was pulled after five innings having allowed the five runs on six hits and a walk while striking out four. He threw 86 pitches. Carlos Torres came on in relief of Matsuzaka in the sixth.

The Angels to lower the right field wall

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The Los Angeles Angels announced today that they will lower the right field wall at Angel Stadium from 18 feet to eight feet.

The stated reason: to make room for a new out-of-town scoreboard and “philosophical changes.” Obviously, though, helping out lefty power hitters is on the agenda too. As it was, Angel Stadium was in the bottom ten of all parks in allowing homers for lefties.

One of their own lefties is Kole Calhoun, who is a pull hitter. Another one could be Shohei Ohtani, who is a lefty hitter. Although, as a righty pitcher, that could harm him against opposing lefty batters. I’m assuming, though, that the Angels ran a bunch of numbers to establish that this move helps them more than it hurts them, or else they wouldn’t be doing it.