Philadelphia Daily News columnist Marcus Hayes accuses Ken Griffey Jr. of using PEDs

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Ken Griffey Jr. is usually held up as the one slugging superstar from the 90s who did it clean. He may have. We don’t know. Nor do we know that the guys who are accused of it were dirty. But despite all of that uncertainty, there has always been a sense that accusing Griffey of taking PEDs — if anyone ever dared — would be a major, major escalation in the PED wars.

Philadelphia Daily News columnist Marcus Hayes escalated last night.

He was in a long Twitter war with Ryan Lawrence of the Philadelphia Daily News about who was better — Ichiro or Griffey. The entire exchange is play-by-played over at Crossing Broad.  Setting aside the fact that only a dunderhead would say that Ichiro was a better overall player than Griffey, Hayes kept couching his argument about Griffey’s decline years as his “post-PED years.” Lawrence let it go a couple of times, maybe incredulous about what he was reading. But he finally called Hayes on it:

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Hayes never backed down after that, which leaves him on record as saying that Ken Griffey Jr. was a PED user. Because of “catastrophic dropoff and soft-tissue injuries.” I’ve not gone back and looked but I’m guessing Hayes has also accused people of being on the juice specifically because they never dropped off and stayed healthy even as they aged.

Of course that’s the beauty of a witch hunt. You don’t need actual evidence or even coherence. People are already so riled up that evidence and anti-evidence are one and the same.

Anyway, good to know someone who actually works for a mainstream media outlet is on record accusing Ken Griffey Jr. of juicing. I never thought we’d get there, but here we are.

 

Note: this post originally identified Hayes as a “Philly.com” columnist. He is not. He is a columnist for the Philadelphia Daily News. Apologies for the error.

Report: Diamondbacks acquire Steven Souza from Rays in part of three-team deal

Tampa Bay Rays
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Update (6:35 PM ET): This is a three-team deal also involving the Diamondbacks, per Nick Piecoro of the Arizona Republic. The Diamondbacks will receive outfielder Steven Souza from the Rays and second baseman Brandon Drury will head to the Yankees. Lefty reliever Anthony Banda will go to the Rays, Piecoro adds. The Diamondbacks will also receive prospect Taylor Widener from the Yankees, per Joel Sherman of the New York Post. MLB.com’s Steve Gilbert adds that the Rays will get two players to be named later from the D-Backs.

Souza, 28, is earning $3.55 million in his first of three years of arbitration eligibility, so the Rays are presumably saving money in moving him. Last season, Souza hit a productive .239/.351/.459 with 30 home runs, 78 RBI, 78 runs scored, and 16 stolen bases in 617 plate appearances. Souza’s arrival almost certainly pushes Yasmany Tomas out of a starting gig.

Drury, 25, has played a handful of positions in his brief major league career. Last year, he played second base in Arizona, batting .267/.317/.447 with 13 home runs and 63 RBI in 480 PA.

Banda, 24, made his major league debut last season, posting an ugly 5.96 ERA with a 25/10 K/BB ratio in 25 2/3 innings. The peripherals suggest he pitched better than his ERA indicated.

Widener, 23, was selected by the Yankees in the 12th round of the 2016 draft. This past season with High-A Tampa, he pitched 119 1/3 innings and posted a 3.39 ERA with a 129/50 K/BB ratio. MLB Pipeline rated Widener as the 14th-best prospect in the Yankees’ system.

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Robert Murray of FanRag Sports reports that the Rays will acquire second base prospect Nick Solak from the Yankees. The Yankees’ return is presently not known.

Solak, 23, was selected by the Yankees in the second round of the 2016 draft. He spent last season between High-A Tampa and Double-A Trenton, hitting a combined .297/.384/.452 with 12 home runs, 53 RBI, 72 runs scored, and 14 stolen bases.

MLB Pipeline ranked Solak as the eighth-best prospect in the Yankees’ system and the fifth-best second base prospect in baseball, praising him for his ability to hit line drives as well as his speed.