Great Moments in Missing The Entire Point of Major League Baseball

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I first saw that Bill Plaschke column about the Dodgers benching Yasiel Puig I linked in this morning’s And That Happened last night right after it went up.  At the time the Dodgers game was still going on and the column was still basically “the Dodgers needed to bench Puig for his own good; good call.” What I had missed until just a few minutes ago was Plaschke’s update which came after Puig hit the big go-ahead pinch-hit homer.

The update is something else:

They need less of Puig’s reckless on-field behavior. They need less of his arrogant refusal to listen to instruction. They need less of an attitude that infuriates umpires. But they love the victories that the reckless, arrogant attitude produces.

They needed to bench him Tuesday. But they couldn’t bear to bench him for the entire game.

He needs to learn. But Mattingly showed that he’s unwilling to possibly sacrifice a victory to finish the lecture … With one swing Puig won a game, but, in playing him, the Dodgers risked losing much more.

Sorry: but if you look at a manager putting a player into the game in a key spot and that player hitting a clutch, go-ahead homer as some bad thing, you may very well have disappeared up into your own butt, Mr. Sportswriter. You may very well have allowed your preferred narrative — “untamed, swaggering head case needs to be taught a lesson” — obscure the fact that Don Mattingly’s job is to win baseball games and Yasiel Puig’s job is to crush baseballs. This isn’t Little League. Life lessons are great if you can get them, but it’s winning that keeps people employed and fans going through the turnstiles.

I suppose the Dodgers’ lead is too big to expect the Dbacks or someone to catch them for the last playoff spot. And I certainly wish no misfortune on them. But it would be something if the NL West came down to the last day of the season and the Dodgers ended up making the playoffs by one game. If that happened I’d be curious to see if Plaschke remembered this game and his preference to see the Dodgers lose in the name of the Education of Yasiel Puig.

Aaron Judge’s record strikeout streak ends at 37 games

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For the first time in a month and a half, Aaron Judge went an entire game without striking out, ending his record streak at 37 games. Judge had an RBI single and three walks in Tuesday night’s 13-4 victory over the Tigers.

Judge went 1-for-4 with a solo home run and zero strikeouts in a 9-4 loss to the Brewers on July 7. Between July 8 and August 20, Judge would strike out in all 37 games, breaking the record previously held by Adam Dunn, who struck out in the first 32 games of the 2012 season. If one counted streaks extending into multiple seasons, Dunn held the record at 36 games as he struck out in his final four games in 2011 as well.

After Tuesday’s performance, Judge is now hitting .284/.417/.594 with 37 home runs, 81 RBI, and 93 runs scored in 525 plate appearances on the season. He’s had a particularly rough second half, as he entered Tuesday with a .684 OPS since the All-Star break, a far cry from his 1.139 OPS before the break.

Video: Adrian Gonzalez doubles for his 2,000th career hit

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Dodgers first baseman Adrian Gonzalez was able to get a ground ball past Pirates first baseman Josh Bell for a double leading off the top of the sixth inning of Tuesday night’s game. He would come around to score later in the inning on a Corey Seager single, breaking a 1-1 tie.

The double gave Gonzalez 2,000 hits for his career. He is the 282nd player in baseball history and the 11th active player to reach 2,000 career hits. Gonzalez also has 300 home runs, making him one of 94 players with at least 300 dingers and 2,000 hits.

Gonzalez, who was recently activated from the disabled list, entered Tuesday’s action hitting .247/.295/.330 with one home run and 25 RBI in 201 plate appearances on the season.