Great Moments in Missing The Entire Point of Major League Baseball

56 Comments

I first saw that Bill Plaschke column about the Dodgers benching Yasiel Puig I linked in this morning’s And That Happened last night right after it went up.  At the time the Dodgers game was still going on and the column was still basically “the Dodgers needed to bench Puig for his own good; good call.” What I had missed until just a few minutes ago was Plaschke’s update which came after Puig hit the big go-ahead pinch-hit homer.

The update is something else:

They need less of Puig’s reckless on-field behavior. They need less of his arrogant refusal to listen to instruction. They need less of an attitude that infuriates umpires. But they love the victories that the reckless, arrogant attitude produces.

They needed to bench him Tuesday. But they couldn’t bear to bench him for the entire game.

He needs to learn. But Mattingly showed that he’s unwilling to possibly sacrifice a victory to finish the lecture … With one swing Puig won a game, but, in playing him, the Dodgers risked losing much more.

Sorry: but if you look at a manager putting a player into the game in a key spot and that player hitting a clutch, go-ahead homer as some bad thing, you may very well have disappeared up into your own butt, Mr. Sportswriter. You may very well have allowed your preferred narrative — “untamed, swaggering head case needs to be taught a lesson” — obscure the fact that Don Mattingly’s job is to win baseball games and Yasiel Puig’s job is to crush baseballs. This isn’t Little League. Life lessons are great if you can get them, but it’s winning that keeps people employed and fans going through the turnstiles.

I suppose the Dodgers’ lead is too big to expect the Dbacks or someone to catch them for the last playoff spot. And I certainly wish no misfortune on them. But it would be something if the NL West came down to the last day of the season and the Dodgers ended up making the playoffs by one game. If that happened I’d be curious to see if Plaschke remembered this game and his preference to see the Dodgers lose in the name of the Education of Yasiel Puig.

Report: Diamondbacks acquire Steven Souza from Rays; Yankees land Brandon Drury

AP Photo
8 Comments

Update (6:35 PM ET): This is a three-team deal also involving the Diamondbacks, per Nick Piecoro of the Arizona Republic. The Diamondbacks will receive outfielder Steven Souza from the Rays and second baseman Brandon Drury will head to the Yankees. Lefty reliever Anthony Banda will go to the Rays, Piecoro adds. The Diamondbacks will also receive prospect Taylor Widener from the Yankees, per Joel Sherman of the New York Post. MLB.com’s Steve Gilbert adds that the Rays will get two players to be named later from the D-Backs.

Souza, 28, is earning $3.55 million in his first of three years of arbitration eligibility, so the Rays are presumably saving money in moving him. Last season, Souza hit a productive .239/.351/.459 with 30 home runs, 78 RBI, 78 runs scored, and 16 stolen bases in 617 plate appearances. Souza’s arrival almost certainly pushes Yasmany Tomas out of a starting gig.

Drury, 25, has played a handful of positions in his brief major league career. Last year, he played second base in Arizona, batting .267/.317/.447 with 13 home runs and 63 RBI in 480 PA.

Banda, 24, made his major league debut last season, posting an ugly 5.96 ERA with a 25/10 K/BB ratio in 25 2/3 innings. The peripherals suggest he pitched better than his ERA indicated.

Widener, 23, was selected by the Yankees in the 12th round of the 2016 draft. This past season with High-A Tampa, he pitched 119 1/3 innings and posted a 3.39 ERA with a 129/50 K/BB ratio. MLB Pipeline rated Widener as the 14th-best prospect in the Yankees’ system.

*

Robert Murray of FanRag Sports reports that the Rays will acquire second base prospect Nick Solak from the Yankees. The Yankees’ return is presently not known.

Solak, 23, was selected by the Yankees in the second round of the 2016 draft. He spent last season between High-A Tampa and Double-A Trenton, hitting a combined .297/.384/.452 with 12 home runs, 53 RBI, 72 runs scored, and 14 stolen bases.

MLB Pipeline ranked Solak as the eighth-best prospect in the Yankees’ system and the fifth-best second base prospect in baseball, praising him for his ability to hit line drives as well as his speed.