And That Happened: Yasiel Puig’s benching edition

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Dodgers 6, Marlins 4: Yasiel Puig was benched because of attitude issues and poor play but then was used as a pinch hitter and smacked the go-ahead homer. My thing on the benching itself: it’s Don Mattingly’s team and he knows it best and can do what he wants.

What I really, really dislike, however, is the sentiment from the armchair managers like Plaschke and Morosi and others who called for the benching and then nodded when it happened with their gatekeeping/pledge-hazing sanctimony and their conviction that this young man needs to be a taught a lesson for some reason. Plaschke notes disapprovingly of Puig’s “swagger.” Which is funny, because guys like him are the first to call for the return of “swagger” when a team is playing poorly. Maybe it’s just bad when Puig does it because, well, I guess you’ll have to ask Plaschke.

File this all under “we are fans and observers,” not coaches, and that we should be bummed when a great, exciting talent like Puig is benched for whatever reason. Chiming in with “this is the right thing to do” as if Puig presents some real problem for the team that outweighs the benefits he brings is just distasteful to me. Go raise your own kid.

Sorry, just a tad grumpy this morning. And, for reasons that aren’t terribly important, unable to get to a full-blown And That Happened either. Apologies. Here are the scores. Perhaps I’ll regain my swagger later this morning.

Rockies 5, Phillies 3
Yankees 8, Blue Jays 4; Yankees 3, Blue Jays 2
Diamondbacks 5, Reds 2
Rays 7, Orioles 4
Mets 5, Braves 3
Twins 6, Tigers 3
Nationals 4, Cubs 2
Rangers 4, Astros 2
Brewers 6, Cardinals 3
White Sox 2, Royals 0
Pirates 8, Padres 1
Indians 4, Angels 1
Giants 3, Red Sox 2
Mariners 7, Athletics 4

Joe Maddon: “I have a defensive foot fetish.”

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The Cubs’ defense — or lack thereof this year — has been a topic of conversation as it could help explain why the team hasn’t played at the elite level it played at last year.

Manager Joe Maddon tried to go into detail about that but ended up channeling his inner Rex Ryan. Via CSN Chicago’s Patrick Mooney.

Well then.

The Nationals have scored 62 runs during four Joe Ross starts

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If, in the future, Joe Ross ever complains about a lack of run support, point to his first four starts of the 2017 season.

Ross started on April 19 in Atlanta against the Braves, on April 25 in Colorado against the Rockies, on April 30 at home against the Mets, and on May 23 at home against the Mariners. In those games, the Nats’ offense scored 14, 15, 23, and 10 runs respectively for a total of 62 runs, or an average of 15.5 per start. Ross was the pitcher of record for seven, eight, 10, and 10 runs for a total of 35 runs (8.75 runs per start), which would still make him the major league leader in run support by that restrictive standard.

Among qualified starters — Ross did not qualify — entering Tuesday’s action, the Rockies’ Antonio Senzatela led the way according to ESPN, averaging 7.11 runs of support in nine starts. The Rockies scored double-digit runs in only three of those starts, oddly enough.

Per the Nationals, the 62 runs of support for Ross is a major league record in a pitcher’s first four starts of a season.