And That Happened: Yasiel Puig’s benching edition

54 Comments

Dodgers 6, Marlins 4: Yasiel Puig was benched because of attitude issues and poor play but then was used as a pinch hitter and smacked the go-ahead homer. My thing on the benching itself: it’s Don Mattingly’s team and he knows it best and can do what he wants.

What I really, really dislike, however, is the sentiment from the armchair managers like Plaschke and Morosi and others who called for the benching and then nodded when it happened with their gatekeeping/pledge-hazing sanctimony and their conviction that this young man needs to be a taught a lesson for some reason. Plaschke notes disapprovingly of Puig’s “swagger.” Which is funny, because guys like him are the first to call for the return of “swagger” when a team is playing poorly. Maybe it’s just bad when Puig does it because, well, I guess you’ll have to ask Plaschke.

File this all under “we are fans and observers,” not coaches, and that we should be bummed when a great, exciting talent like Puig is benched for whatever reason. Chiming in with “this is the right thing to do” as if Puig presents some real problem for the team that outweighs the benefits he brings is just distasteful to me. Go raise your own kid.

Sorry, just a tad grumpy this morning. And, for reasons that aren’t terribly important, unable to get to a full-blown And That Happened either. Apologies. Here are the scores. Perhaps I’ll regain my swagger later this morning.

Rockies 5, Phillies 3
Yankees 8, Blue Jays 4; Yankees 3, Blue Jays 2
Diamondbacks 5, Reds 2
Rays 7, Orioles 4
Mets 5, Braves 3
Twins 6, Tigers 3
Nationals 4, Cubs 2
Rangers 4, Astros 2
Brewers 6, Cardinals 3
White Sox 2, Royals 0
Pirates 8, Padres 1
Indians 4, Angels 1
Giants 3, Red Sox 2
Mariners 7, Athletics 4

Umpire admits he blew the call that got Joe Maddon ejected last night

Getty Images
Leave a comment

Last night in the top of the eighth inning of the Dodgers-Cubs game, Curtis Granderson struck out. Or, at the very least, he should’ve. After the game, the umpire who said he didn’t admitted he screwed up.

While trying to squelch a Dodgers comeback, Wade Davis got Granderson into a 2-2 count. Davis threw his pitch, Granderson whiffed on it, it hit the dirt, and Willson Contreras applied the tag for the out. End of the inning, right? Wrong: Granderson argued to home plate umpire Jim Wolf that he made slight contact with the ball, Wolf, after conferring with the other umps agreed, and Granderson lived to see another pitch.

Before he’d see that pitch, Joe Maddon came out to argue the call and got so agitated about it all he was ejected for the second time in this series. He was right to argue:

It all ended up not mattering, of course, because Granderson struck out eventually anyway.

Normally such things end there, but after the game a reporter got to Wolf and Wolf did something umpires don’t often do: he admitted he blew the call:

It’s good that the bad call ended up not affecting anything. But the part of me who likes to stir up crap and watch chaos rule in baseball really kinda wishes that Granderson had hit a series-clinching homer right after that. At least as long as it didn’t result in Cubs fans burning Chicago to the ground.