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“Today is my 60th birthday. Today is the last day of my life. Today, I committed suicide.”

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I didn’t know Martin Manley. I was vaguely aware of who he was. He contributed to a sports blog for the Kansas City Star for a few years. He maintained the Sports in Review blog, which I’d looked at a few times. There are a lot of people like that who have floated around the sabermetric universe over the past 20 or 30 years: acquaintances of acquaintances whose name rings a bell and who, if you Google a bit or jog your memory some you can place.

I don’t think I’ll forget him now. He killed himself on Thursday. It was his 60th birthday. And before doing it he wrote up an insanely-detailed website setting forth his reasons for it and his life story. The most notable thing about it: he was not sick. He was not poor or in trouble or, on the surface anyway, depressed or in distress of any kind. He simply decided that 60 years was enough and that he wanted to do it.

The website — which I have been reading for a couple of hours now — reads like someone working out a simple problem of logic. Instead of concluding something mundane, however, it concludes with Manley killing himself for reasons stated.

I know it has nothing to do with baseball, but Manley sounds like a lot of people who comment around here or who frequent Baseball Think Factory or who hang around on Twitter. Older than most web-based folks, but imbued with a certain perspective and politeness about them as a result.

I have no idea what to make of it, but it seems like more than anything else, Manley wanted his story to be shared, so I am sharing it. And I am simultaneously remembering that we don’t know a hell of a lot about anyone or about this world for that matter.

(thanks to Rob Neyer for the heads up)

Hisashi Iwakuma’s 2017 option vests, but salary still undetermined

OAKLAND, CA - AUGUST 13: Hisashi Iwakuma #18 of the Seattle Mariners pitches against the Oakland Athletics in the bottom of the third inning at the Oakland Coliseum on August 13, 2016 in Oakland, California. (Photo by Thearon W. Henderson/Getty Images)
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With last Wednesday’s start against the Yankees, Mariners hurler Hisashi Iwakuma pushed his 2016 innings total up to 2016. That clears the 162-inning hurdle for his 2017 option to vest at $14 million. However, as Steve Adams of MLB Trade Rumors reports, the language in Iwakuma’s contract also stipulates that the right-hander finish the season without suffering a specific injury.

Iwakuma, 35, was in agreement with the Dodgers on a three-year contract back in December but failed the physical, which nullified the deal. He ended up signing with the Mariners on a one-year, $12 million deal with a full no-trade clause and club options for 2017 and ’18 that vest at specific inning thresholds (162 each or 324 for both seasons).

This season, Iwakuma has stayed healthy, making 26 starts to the tune of a 14-9 record, a 3.81 ERA and a 118/36 K/BB ratio in 163 innings.

Ichiro Suzuki passes Wade Boggs for 27th on baseball’s all-time hits list

MIAMI, FL - AUGUST 28: Ichiro Suzuki #51 of the Miami Marlins grounds out during the 2nd inning against the San Diego Padres at Marlins Park on August 28, 2016 in Miami, Florida. (Photo by Eric Espada/Getty Images)
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Marlins outfielder Ichiro Suzuki deposited a single to left-center field in the fourth inning of Monday night’s game against the Mets, then added a double to center field in the eighth. Those mark hits No. 3,010 and 3,011 for Suzuki in his major league career, tying and then moving past Wade Boggs for sole possession of 27th on baseball’s all-time hits list.

Suzuki would come around to score on a double by Xavier Scruggs to break a scoreless tie in the eighth.

Here’s the video of Ichiro’s first hit.

By the end of the season, Suzuki will have presumably moved ahead of Rafael Palmeiro (26th; 3,020) and Lou Brock (25th; 3,023).

Suzuki was 2-for-4 after the double. With baseball’s fifth month nearly complete, the 42-year-old is currently batting .298/.371/.373.