So, Jeff Pearlman: how do you really feel about Alex Rodriguez?

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Jeff Pearlman writes today that Ryan Dempster is a hero for throwing a baseball at Alex Rodriguez. But I’m not quite sure how strongly he feels about it. Please judge for yourself:

F**k you for cheating. F**k you for stealing paychecks. F**k you for influencing the outcomes of games. F**k you for lying. F**k you for dragging us all down. F**k you—Ryan Braun and Mark McGwire and Sammy Sosa and Roger Clemens and Miguel Tejada and Nelson Cruz and Barry Bonds and Jhonny Peralta and Paul Lo Duca and every other guy who felt the need to inject nonsense into their bodies to help accomplish what, naturally, they could not.

F**k you.

But no, people aren’t irrationally upset about what a baseball player has done. And me saying that, perhaps, people have blown A-Rod’s transgressions out of proportion is totally radical and crazy and I just do it for page views. Yep.

Say what you want about Pearlman — I know a lot of people don’t care for his stuff — but he is a respected journalist within the industry who regularly publishes well-read books and has spent time at some prestigious publications such as Sports Illustrated. Maybe he’s out there quite a bit, but make no mistake: there are a lot of people who feel this about A-Rod even if they don’t put it in print.

And thus when I say that maybe, just maybe, people in the media are unfairly painting the guy as History’s Greatest Monster, I am not being hysterical.

Mets invite Tim Tebow to spring training

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Tim Tebow isn’t letting go of his major league dreams just yet. The former NFL quarterback is slated to appear with the Mets during spring training this year, extending what initially looked like an ill-fated career choice for at least one more season. Per the club’s official announcement on Friday, he’ll join a group of spring training invitees that includes top-30 prospects like Peter Alonso, P.J. Conlon, Patrick Mazeika and David Thompson.

Tebow, 30, hasn’t taken to professional baseball as gracefully as expected. He batted a cumulative .226/.309/.347 with eight home runs and a .656 OPS in 486 plate appearances for Single-A Columbia and High-A St. Lucie in 2017. While that wasn’t enough to compel the Mets to give the aging outfielder a big league tryout, there’s no denying that Tebow brought substantial benefit to their minor league affiliates — in the form of increased attendance figures and ticket sales, that is.

Even after the Mets were booted from the NL East race last September, they resisted the idea of promoting Tebow for a late-season attendance boost of their own. That’s not to say they’re planning on taking the same approach in 2018; Tebow will undoubtedly get his cup of coffee in the majors at some point, but for now, a Grapefruit League tryout is likely as close as he’ll ever get to playing with the team’s big league roster on an everyday basis.