Ryan Braun was pretty sleazy when he tried to lobby other players for support back in 2012

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We’ve noted that Ryan Braun’s public comments about the man who handled his urine sample back when he tested positive for testosterone in 2011 were low rent and uncalled-for, what with the implication, however oblique, that it was possible that the sample was tampered with.  Buster Olney reported last night that his private comments — behind the scenes to other players whom he was attempting to rally for support — were worse.

Specifically, he was trying to create the impression among them that the sample collector was out to get him due to either anti-semitism or the fact that he was a Cubs fan:

According to sources, Braun called veteran players around baseball privately at that time to lobby for their support. In the calls — confirmed by three sources — Braun told other players that in the preparation for his appeal, some information had become known about the collector of his urine sample, Dino Laurenzi Jr., including that he was a Cubs fan — with the implication he might work against Braun, who played for a division rival of the Cubs.

Braun, who is Jewish, also told the players that he had been told the collector was an anti-Semite.

This is leaps and bounds beyond what he ever said in his public comments and is, above all else, really pathetic. Especially considering his ultimate defense to the sample was a technical one, related to collection methods, and not one where the motives or character of anyone involved was actually litigated.

Braun is said to be coming around to the idea of “coming clean” soon after the heat dies down. If he does, this is something he had better come clean on and for which he had best find a way to make amends.

 

 

Mets invite Tim Tebow to spring training

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Tim Tebow isn’t letting go of his major league dreams just yet. The former NFL quarterback is slated to appear with the Mets during spring training this year, extending what initially looked like an ill-fated career choice for at least one more season. Per the club’s official announcement on Friday, he’ll join a group of spring training invitees that includes top-30 prospects like Peter Alonso, P.J. Conlon, Patrick Mazeika and David Thompson.

Tebow, 30, hasn’t taken to professional baseball as gracefully as expected. He batted a cumulative .226/.309/.347 with eight home runs and a .656 OPS in 486 plate appearances for Single-A Columbia and High-A St. Lucie in 2017. While that wasn’t enough to compel the Mets to give the aging outfielder a big league tryout, there’s no denying that Tebow brought substantial benefit to their minor league affiliates — in the form of increased attendance figures and ticket sales, that is.

Even after the Mets were booted from the NL East race last September, they resisted the idea of promoting Tebow for a late-season attendance boost of their own. That’s not to say they’re planning on taking the same approach in 2018; Tebow will undoubtedly get his cup of coffee in the majors at some point, but for now, a Grapefruit League tryout is likely as close as he’ll ever get to playing with the team’s big league roster on an everyday basis.