Miguel Tejada was also linked to Biogenesis


Royals infielder Miguel Tejada was handed a 105-game suspension from MLB over the weekend following multiple positive tests for amphetamine use, but Pedro Gomez of ESPN.com reports that the former American League MVP was also implicated in the recent Biogenesis investigation. In fact, it appears MLB leveraged his link to Biogenesis to get him to drop an appeal on his 105-game suspension.

Major League Baseball had the choice of going after the 2002 American League MVP for the Biogenesis case, as the league did 13 other players earlier this month, or for the amphetamine case. MLB chose to suspend Tejada after he tested positive for a third time in his career for amphetamines.

Tejada, according to a source familiar with the case, was given the choice of either accepting the 105-game suspension for amphetamine use or facing additional punishment for his Biogenesis connection. Tejada was allegedly a customer of Tony Bosch’s shuttered clinic, which is at the heart of baseball’s recent rash of suspensions. Bosch supplied evidence that Tejada had been a Biogenesis customer.

Tejada has been linked to performance-enhancing drugs dating back to the Mitchell Report and plead guilty to misleading Congress back in 2009. He admitted to purchasing human growth hormone (HGH) in the past, but claimed that he threw the drugs away before injecting them. It’s not clear what he may have purchased from Biogenesis, but any denials are going to ring pretty hollow at this point.

The Royals recently moved Tejada to the 60-day disabled list following a calf strain, so his season was essentially over anyway, but the suspension will also knock him out of commission for the first 64 games in 2014. The 39-year-old has insisted that he doesn’t plan to retire, but there’s a real chance that we have seen the last of him in the majors.

Mike Trout has yet to strike out this spring

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Everyone is well aware of how good Angels outfielder Mike Trout is at the game of baseball. The 26-year-old is already an all-time great, having won two MVP awards — and arguably deserving of two others — and the 2012 Rookie of the Year Award. He has accrued 54.2 WAR, per Baseball Reference, which is right around the threshold for a Hall of Fame career. Trout does it all: he draws walks, he hits for average, he hits for power, he steals bases, he plays good defense.

But here’s an achievement that is amazing even for a player like Trout: he has yet to strike out this spring. In 41 Cactus League plate appearances, he has 10 hits (including a triple and two homers) and six walks with zero strikeouts. Across his career, Trout has a 21.5 percent strikeout rate, right around the league average. He isn’t usually such a stickler for avoiding the punch-out, but this spring he is.

To put this in perspective, 134 players this spring have struck out at least 10 times, according to MLB.com. 938 players have struck out at least once. The only other players to have taken at least 10 at-bats without striking out this spring are Humberto Arteaga (Royals, 23 AB), Tony Cruz (Reds, 18 AB), Oscar Hernandez (Red Sox, 10 AB), and Jacob Stallings (Pirates, 18 AB).

According to Angels assistant hitting coach Paul Sorrento, the lack of strikeouts hasn’t been a conscious effort from Trout, Jeff Fletcher of the Orange County Register reports. Ho hum. The best player in baseball is apparently getting even better.