New York Yankees v Los Angeles Dodgers

Dodgers’ 10-game winning streak snapped on pair of Hanley Ramirez errors


When the Dodgers entered Philadelphia to open up a three-game set against the Phillies, the two teams were on wildly divergent paths. The Phillies had lost 19 of 24 games since the All-Star break while the Dodgers had won 23 of 26. In the first two games of the Phillies, they did exactly as they should — they dominated the Phillies with two consecutive shut-outs, 4-0 behind Zack Greinke and 5-0 behind Clayton Kershaw.

The Dodgers staked starter Ricky Nolasco to an early 2-0 lead in the series finale this afternoon, but a solo home run by Darin Ruf and an RBI ground out by Cody Asche left the game tied going into the seventh. Both bullpens held serve going into the bottom of the ninth, when the Dodgers called on Brandon League to bring them to extra innings.

Paco Rodriguez struck out Asche to lead off the inning before giving way to Brandon League. Casper Wells hit what appeared to be a routine ground out to Ramirez at shortstop, but Ramirez’s throw was short and first baseman Jerry Hairston couldn’t corral it. Catcher Carlos Ruiz punched a single to right field to push Wells to third base. Controversially, manager Don Mattingly opted to intentionally walk Jimmy Rollins to load the bases. Rather than let Michael Martinez hit, new Phillies manager Ryne Sandberg pinch-hit with Michael Young, who did not start due to an aching Achilles. On the fifth pitch of the at-bat, Young hit what appeared to be a dead double play ball, but Ramirez bobbled it as he preemptively positioned himself to make the throw to second, allowing Wells to score the winning run. For those of you counting at home, that was ninth-inning error number two Ramirez.

It is certainly not the way the Dodgers wanted to be leaving Philadelphia, but the good news is that they will have a great opportunity to continue expanding their lead in the NL West as they open a four-game set against the Marlins in Miami.

The 2005 White Sox continue to be erased


We noted yesterday that in the rush to name the Cubs the saviors of Chicago sports fans everywhere, the 2005 Chicago White Sox — and the 1959 White Sox for that matter — are being completely overlooked as World Series champs and pennant winners, respectively.

That continued last night, as first ESPN and then the Washington Post erased the Chisox out of existence in the name of pushing their Cubs-driven narrative. I mean, get a load of this graphic:

Was there no one at the world’s largest sports network — not an anchor, production assistant, researcher, intern or even a dang janitor who could tell them what was wrong with this? Guess not!

Meanwhile, the normally reliable Barry Svrluga gives the Cubs the 2004 Red Sox treatment as a group of players who will never have to buy a drink in their city again. His story is better about keeping it franchise-centric as opposed to making it a city-wide thing, but whoever is responsible for the tweet promoting the story makes a Cubs World Series a unique thing for not just Cubs fans, but Chicago as a whole:

The White Sox play in the AL Central so I assume their fans have no love at all for the Cleveland Indians. But I can’t help but think a good number of them are rooting for the Tribe simply to push back against the complete whitewashing of the White Sox.

Kyle Schwarber is on a private plane en route to Cleveland

PHOENIX, AZ - APRIL 07:  Kyle Schwarber #12 of the Chicago Cubs bats against the Arizona Diamondbacks during the MLB game at Chase Field on April 7, 2016 in Phoenix, Arizona.  (Photo by Christian Petersen/Getty Images)
Getty Images

This is happening, people.

Earlier we heard Joe Maddon being non-committal about Kyle Schwarber joining the Cubs for the World Series. Now it seems pretty clear that the Cubs are committal indeed: Jon Morosi reports that Schwarber is en route to Cleveland from Arizona on a private jet and that he’s expected to DH in Game 1 tomorrow night.

Schwarber hasn’t played in a game that counted since April 7. His potent bat is could be a windfall for a Cubs team that didn’t have a game-changing option at DH in the American League park.

Schwarber lost the whole season due to a knee injury, but he hit .246/.355/.487 with 16 homers and 43 RBI in 69 games as a rookie in 2015. His big coming out party was in the playoffs, however, when he hit three homers in five postseason games while going 7-for-13 with two walks in five games.