Alex Rodriguez Reuters

Alex Rodriguez’s lawyer accuses the Yankees of being misleading about his client’s injury

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When denying a report that his camp had leaked the names of Ryan Braun and Francisco Cervelli to the press, Alex Rodriguez cryptically said yesterday that “for the next seven weeks, it’s going to be a very, very bumpy road.” He wasn’t kidding.

Rodriguez’s bombastic new lawyer, Joseph Tacopina, has made some pretty bold claims in an interview with the New York Times, the most prominent of which is that the Yankees hid results of an MRI that showed a torn labrum in his hip and allowed him to play hurt in the postseason last year.

“They rolled him out there like an invalid and made him look like he was finished as a ballplayer,” Tacopina said.

That’s just the tip of the iceberg in Tacopina’s all-out-assault. In addition to claiming that the Yankees and MLB are working in concert to ruin his client, he relayed a supposed conversation where team president Randy Levine wished A-Rod’s hip injury would prevent him from every playing again.

Rodriguez learned the extent of his injuries in the off-season, and the Yankees sent him to Dr. Bryan T. Kelly, a prominent surgeon at the Hospital for Special Surgery in Manhattan. Tacopina said Kelly later told Rodriguez that before the surgery, Levine told Kelly, “I don’t ever want to see him on the field again.”

“It sent chills down Alex’s spine,” Tacopina said.

And while the “What would George do?” card is usually reserved for hacky columnists, Tacopina found a way to use it in defense of his client.

“We have basically had enough,” Tacopina said Friday night. “The process is being perverted when they act the way they do to make their case. They are pushing Alex to his limit.”

He added: “The legacy of George Steinbrenner would be horrified. This is the New York Yankees. This isn’t some thug-culture club.”

Oh, how soon we forget Howie Spira. In any case, Levine told the New York Times that “each and every one of these allegations is specious and completely false.” He also told Andy McCullough of the Newark Star-Ledger that A-Rod needs to “put up or shut up” and file a grievance if he “really believes” that he was mistreated by the team.

By the way, Rodriguez is in the lineup at third base this afternoon against the Red Sox. This situation is reaching new levels of awkward.

Keith Law: The Braves have the best farm system. Who has the worst?

PHOENIX, AZ - APRIL 06:  General manager Dave Stewart of the Arizona Diamondbacks laughs on the field before the Opening Day MLB game against the San Francisco Giants at Chase Field on April 6, 2015 in Phoenix, Arizona.  (Photo by Christian Petersen/Getty Images)
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Why is this man smiling? Man, I wouldn’t be smiling if I read what I just read.

This is the week when ESPN’s Keith Law releases his prospect and farm system rankings. He kicks off his content this week with a top-to-bottom ranking of all 30 farm systems. As a rule he limits his analysis to players who are currently in the minors and who have not yet exhausted their rookie of the year eligibility.

For the second straight year, Law ranks the Braves as the best system in baseball. Number two — making a big leap from last year’s number 13 ranking – is the New York Yankees. Dead last: the Arizona Diamondbacks, which Law says “Dave Stewart ritually disemboweled” over the past two years. That’s gotta hurt.

If you want to know the reasons and the rankings of everyone in between you’ll have to get an ESPN Insider subscription. Sorry, I know everyone hates to pay for content on the Internet, but Keith and others who do this kind of work put a lot of damn work into it and this is what pays their bills. I typically don’t like to pay for content myself, but I do pay for an ESPN Insider subscription. It’s worth it for Law’s work alone.

The Blue Jays will . . . not be blue some days next year

blue jays logo
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The Toronto Blue Jays, like a lot of teams, will wear an alternate jersey next year. It’ll be for Sunday home games. They call it their “Canadiana,” uniforms. Which, hey, let’s hear it for national pride.

(question to Canada: my grandmother and my three of my four maternal great-grandparents were Canadian. Does that give me any rights to emigrate? You know, just in case? No reason for asking that today. Just curious!).

Anyway, these are the uniforms:

More like RED Jays, am I right?

OK, I am not going to leave this country. I’m going to stay here and fight for what’s right: a Major League Baseball-wide ban on all red alternate jerseys for anyone except the Cincinnati Reds, who make theirs work somehow. All of the rest of them look terrible.

Oh, Canada indeed.