Managers won’t run the challenge replay system. Players will.

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Categorize this under “Deep Thoughts,” but it occurred to me a bit ago that the managers won’t really be the ones “empowered” — to use John Schuerholz’s word — under the proposed manager challenge replay system. In fact, they’re bound to be more pressured by it than empowered. It will be the players running it, actually.

How many times do you see this happen: close play, maybe a tag play or something. The player who has the call go against him, be it the base runner or the fielder, reacts immediately. He was right there and he knows he got boned on the call. He pleads for a minute. Sometimes that’s the end of it. Often times — maybe most of the time — the manager runs out onto the field to take over the argument.

Won’t that dictate when replay challenges are used? When the player pleads with the manager or is animated in his reaction at the wrong call? How does a manager go to the press after a game and answer the “why didn’t you go challenge the play your shortstop was arguing about?” question? How does he avoid having players feel undermined or not supported by their manager?  Answer: he can’t. He has to challenge those plays whether he really saw some injustice or not. And he likely didn’t see it as good anyway, so why not give the benefit of the doubt to the guy on the field.

So let’s not call it a manager challenge. It’ll be, in practice, a player challenge, with managers feeling pressured and obligated into having their players’ backs. Just like most manager-umpire arguments now.

Rays trade Jake Odorizzi to Twins

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The Rays have traded right-hander Jake Odorizzi to the Twins, per team announcements on Saturday evening. The Twins will receive minor league shortstop Jermaine Palacios in the deal. Despite previous speculation, recently-DFA’d outfielder Corey Dickerson was not included in the trade.

With Odorizzi, the Twins finally have the front-end starter they’ve been seeking all winter. It’s a bargain deal as well, as the 27-year-old righty is under contract through 2019 and didn’t require the club to part with any of their top-shelf prospects in the trade. Odorizzi will be looking to stage a comeback in 2018 after a dismal performance with the Rays last year, during which he eked out a career-worst 4.14 ERA, 3.8 BB/9 and 8.0 SO/9 through 143 1/3 innings.

Palacios, 21, ranked no. 27 in the Twins’ system last season. He split his year between Single-A Cedar Rapids and High-A Fort Myers, raking a combined .296/.333/.454 with 13 home runs and 20 stolen bases in 539 plate appearances. He’s expected to continue developing at shortstop, though he’s also seen limited time at second and third base during his four-year career in the minors.