Managers won’t run the challenge replay system. Players will.

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Categorize this under “Deep Thoughts,” but it occurred to me a bit ago that the managers won’t really be the ones “empowered” — to use John Schuerholz’s word — under the proposed manager challenge replay system. In fact, they’re bound to be more pressured by it than empowered. It will be the players running it, actually.

How many times do you see this happen: close play, maybe a tag play or something. The player who has the call go against him, be it the base runner or the fielder, reacts immediately. He was right there and he knows he got boned on the call. He pleads for a minute. Sometimes that’s the end of it. Often times — maybe most of the time — the manager runs out onto the field to take over the argument.

Won’t that dictate when replay challenges are used? When the player pleads with the manager or is animated in his reaction at the wrong call? How does a manager go to the press after a game and answer the “why didn’t you go challenge the play your shortstop was arguing about?” question? How does he avoid having players feel undermined or not supported by their manager?  Answer: he can’t. He has to challenge those plays whether he really saw some injustice or not. And he likely didn’t see it as good anyway, so why not give the benefit of the doubt to the guy on the field.

So let’s not call it a manager challenge. It’ll be, in practice, a player challenge, with managers feeling pressured and obligated into having their players’ backs. Just like most manager-umpire arguments now.

Former major league pitcher Miguel Alfredo Gonzalez dies in traffic accident

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Former Phillies right-hander Miguel Alfredo Gonzalez died in a traffic accident in Havana on Thursday, per reports from the El Nuevo Herald and CiberCuba. No other deaths or injuries have been reported in connection to the accident. Gonzalez was 34 years old.

The Cuban righty defected from his home country in 2013 and signed a three-year, $12 million contract with the Phillies. A bout of right shoulder tendinitis compromised his bid for a major league role, but he finally broke through to the big leagues at the tail end of the 2014 season and turned in a 6.75 ERA, 5.1 BB/9 and 8.4 SO/9 in just six outings. Another case of shoulder inflammation derailed any progress he might have made in 2015, however, and he recorded just five innings in Triple-A Lehigh Valley before the team officially released him prior to the 2016 season.

The Phillies released a statement following news of Gonzalez’s death: