Bud Selig calls his suspension of Alex Rodriguez “eminently fair”

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At the owner’s meetings in Cooperstown, New York, Commissioner Bud Selig defended his decision to suspend Alex Rodriguez through the 2014 season for his involvement in the Biogenesis scandal, calling it “eminently fair”. Selig added he was “trying to be fair, trying to be logical and rational”, per ESPN’s Mike Mazzeo.

As evidenced by his appearance in nine of the Yankees’ ten games since his return, Rodriguez has appealed his suspension. He is hitting .278/.350/.417 with one home run in 40 plate appearances since returning on August 5.

Rodriguez was one of 14 players suspended in the Biogenesis scandal and received the harshest penalty with a 211-game suspension. Brewers outfielder Ryan Braun received a 65-game suspension. Twelve players, including Rangers outfielder Nelson Cruz and Tigers shortstop Jhonny Peralta, received 50-game suspensions.

No one pounds the zone anymore

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“Work fast and throw strikes” has long been the top conventional wisdom for those preaching pitching success. The “work fast” part of that has increasingly gone by the wayside, however, as pitchers take more and more time to throw pitches in an effort to max out their effort and, thus, their velocity with each pitch.

Now, as Ben Lindbergh of The Ringer reports, the “throw strikes” part of it is going out of style too:

Pitchers are throwing fewer pitches inside the strike zone than ever previously recorded . . . A decade ago, more than half of all pitches ended up in the strike zone. Today, that rate has fallen below 47 percent.

There are a couple of reasons for this. Most notable among them, Lindbergh says, being pitchers’ increasing reliance on curves, sliders and splitters as primary pitches, with said pitches not being in the zone by design. Lindbergh doesn’t mention it, but I’d guess that an increased emphasis on catchers’ framing plays a role too, with teams increasingly selecting for catchers who can turn balls that are actually out of the zone into strikes. If you have one of those beasts, why bother throwing something directly over the plate?

There is an unintended downside to all of this: a lack of action. As Lindbergh notes — and as you’ve not doubt noticed while watching games — there are more walks and strikeouts, there is more weak contact from guys chasing bad pitches and, as a result, games and at bats are going longer.

As always, such insights are interesting. As is so often the case these days, however, such insights serve as an unpleasant reminder of why the on-field product is so unsatisfying in so many ways in recent years.