TMZ: A-Rod says he’ll sue if MLB doesn’t drop his suspension. Good luck with that, Alex

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TMZ has a report that Alex Rodriguez is threatening to sue Major League Baseball if his suspension isn’t overturned:

Sources directly connected to A-Rod tell us he’s prepared to march into Federal court next month … unless the 211-game suspension the MLB slapped him with last week isn’t entirely lifted … According to our sources, Alex will sue for various things, including a violation of the Collective Bargaining Agreement between the players’ union and the league.

Well, good luck with that, A-Rod, but you’re part of an arbitration process you agreed to when you signed your contract and to which you are further bound by the collective bargaining agreement between you and your union. If you attempt to circumvent that, a court is highly likely to tell you to take a hike and go have your arbitration. Courts favor arbitration agreements — highly favor them — when they are entered into freely and willingly between two sophisticated parties and they are loathe to intervene.

After your arbitration? Fine, appeal to a court. Then they are only about 99.9% likely to tell you to go away as opposed to the 99.999% likelihood of that happening now, but I suppose it’s not nothing.

This would be a totally different situation if Major League Baseball had first attempted to circumvent the Joint Drug Agreement by suspending A-Rod and not allowing him to play during his appeal. Everything the league is doing now, however, appears to be in compliance with the JDA and the CBA. They may have suspended him for too many games — that’s my view anyway — but that’s a dispute to be handled within the system, not by circumventing it with litigation.

Aaron Judge set a new postseason strikeout record

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For a few days, it looked like Aaron Judge was finally hitting his stride in the postseason. He was still striking out at a regular clip, piling more and more strikeouts atop the 16 he racked up in the Division Series, but he was mashing, too. He engineered a three-run homer during Game 3 of the Championship Series, followed by another blast and game-tying double in Game 4. His one-out double helped pad a five-run lead in Game 5, while his 425-footer off of Brad Peacock barely made a dent during a 7-1 loss in Game 6. And then Lance McCullers‘ curveball found and fooled him, as it did five of the 14 batters it met in Game 7:

The strikeout was Judge’s first of the evening and 27th since the start of the playoffs. No other major league batter has racked up that many strikeouts in a single postseason, though Alfonso Soriano’s 26-strikeout record in 2003 comes the closest. Within that record, Judge also collected three golden sombreros (four strikeouts in a single game), narrowly avoiding the dreaded platinum sombrero (five strikeouts in a single game).

It’s an unfortunate footnote to a spectacular year for the rookie outfielder, who decimated the competition with 52 home runs and 8.2 fWAR during the regular season and was a pivotal part of the Yankees’ playoff run. Thankfully, the image of McCullers’ curveball darting just under Judge’s bat won’t be the image that sticks with us for years to come. Instead, it’ll look something like this: