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TMZ: A-Rod says he’ll sue if MLB doesn’t drop his suspension. Good luck with that, Alex

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TMZ has a report that Alex Rodriguez is threatening to sue Major League Baseball if his suspension isn’t overturned:

Sources directly connected to A-Rod tell us he’s prepared to march into Federal court next month … unless the 211-game suspension the MLB slapped him with last week isn’t entirely lifted … According to our sources, Alex will sue for various things, including a violation of the Collective Bargaining Agreement between the players’ union and the league.

Well, good luck with that, A-Rod, but you’re part of an arbitration process you agreed to when you signed your contract and to which you are further bound by the collective bargaining agreement between you and your union. If you attempt to circumvent that, a court is highly likely to tell you to take a hike and go have your arbitration. Courts favor arbitration agreements — highly favor them — when they are entered into freely and willingly between two sophisticated parties and they are loathe to intervene.

After your arbitration? Fine, appeal to a court. Then they are only about 99.9% likely to tell you to go away as opposed to the 99.999% likelihood of that happening now, but I suppose it’s not nothing.

This would be a totally different situation if Major League Baseball had first attempted to circumvent the Joint Drug Agreement by suspending A-Rod and not allowing him to play during his appeal. Everything the league is doing now, however, appears to be in compliance with the JDA and the CBA. They may have suspended him for too many games — that’s my view anyway — but that’s a dispute to be handled within the system, not by circumventing it with litigation.

Miguel Cabrera blasts two home runs against Braves

DETROIT, MI - SEPTEMBER 28: Miguel Cabrera #24 of the Detroit Tigers hits a three-run home run during the fifth inning of the game against the Cleveland Indians scoring teammates Cameron Maybin #4 and Ian Kinsler #3 (not in photo) on September 28, 2016 at Comerica Park in Detroit, Michigan. (Photo by Leon Halip/Getty Images)
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Even while injured, Miguel Cabrera is a force to be reckoned with. The 33-year-old slugger has been playing with a contusion on his knee since Wednesday, according to postgame comments made by Tigers’ manager Brad Ausmus.

That didn’t stop him from whacking a 410-foot home run against Atlanta right-hander Matt Wisler on Friday night, skirting the center field fence to put the Tigers up 3-0 in the first inning. In the third, he lead off the inning with another long drive off of Wisler, targeting his changeup for a 421-foot shot, his 38th home run of the season:

It’s Cabrera’s sixth two-run homer game since the start of the season, and his first against the Braves since 2005. He needs just two more home runs to keep an even 40 on the year, which would return him to the kind of league-leading levels that accentuated his MVP case in 2012 and 2013. If he can do it by the end of this Tigers-Braves game (unlikely, but not unheard of), he’ll be the 15th major leaguer to hit four home runs in a single game.

Reds’ manager Bryan Price extended through 2017

PHOENIX, AZ - AUGUST 28: Manager Bryan Price #38 of the Cincinnati Reds looks on during the fifth inning against the Arizona Diamondbacks at Chase Field on August 28, 2016 in Phoenix, Arizona.  (Photo by Norm Hall/Getty Images)
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The Reds will roll with manager Bryan Price for at least one more season. Per MLB.com’s Mark Sheldon, Price has been extended through the 2017 season with a club option for 2018. He won’t be the only familiar face leading the team, as the Reds have reportedly asked the entire coaching staff to return as well.

This is Price’s second consecutive season with 90+ losses since Cincinnati signed him to a three-year contract back in 2014. While he hasn’t been able to replicate the same kind of success that former skipper Dusty Baker found in 2012 and 2013, he’s been saddled with a team that’s still in the throes of rebuilding, not one that looks on the cusp of playoff contention. It is, after all, the same team that has not seen a healthy season from Homer Bailey since Price’s arrival, one that unloaded Jay Bruce for a pair of prospects earlier this year and one whose pitching staff set a single-season record for most home runs given up by a major league team.

Justifying Price’s extension requires a different kind of yardstick, one that measures player development and individual success over the cumulative win-loss record. Here, Price has overseen solid performances from contributors like Adam Duvall, who is batting .244/.297/.506 with 2.9 fWAR in his first full major-league season, as well as young arms like Anthony DeSclafani, Brandon Finnegan, and Michael Lorenzen, among others.

From comments made by Reds’ CFO Bob Castellini, Price’s success within a rough rebuilding process appears to have cemented his place within the club, at least for the time being.

I like the young, aggressive team Walt and Dick have put together with players from within our system and from recent trades. […] Bryan has been here seven seasons now. He’s comfortable with the direction we are heading with our young players, and we are comfortable with him leading us in that direction.