Pete Rose’s misdeeds now considered “small beer”

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The same people who freak out when you compare PED cheats to spitballers, bat-corkers and amphetamine poppers are increasingly comparing gambling on baseball to PED use and absolving the gamblers. Because that makes sense. Here’s Frank DeFord who, after talking about how great Ichiro Suzuki is and how awesome Cooperstown will be the day he is inducted, argues that Pete Rose should go in on the same day:

It would also be so appropriate at that time for baseball to finally show some mercy to Pete Rose and let him enter the shrine with Suzuki. The drug cheats have put Rose’s offense in perspective. He did not damage baseball one iota as a player, and his misdeed as a manager now appears as small beer alongside how those druggies dishonored the game, distorted history and robbed their fellow players.

As I’ve said 100 times, I think Pete Rose should be in the Hall of Fame. But I have no idea how that decision depends on there being allegedly worse cheaters coming along later. There is no relation between the PED guys and Rose. They have nothing to do with one another. Unless of course you wanna let Bonds, Clemens, Manny, A-Rod and McGwire in if, some day, another ballplayer murders someone. Then at least you’d be consistent I suppose.

Knock off the relativism already, will ya? Or at least be fair about it. If we’re going to compare the severity of offenses against baseball, include them all and acknowledge that PEDs isn’t the worst thing that ever happened.

Alex Dickerson to miss 2017 season after undergoing back surgery

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Padres’ outfielder Alex Dickerson won’t see PETCO Park anytime soon — at least, not as its starting left fielder. The 27-year-old was diagnosed with a bulging disc in his lower back prior to the start of the 2017 season, and hasn’t made any kind of substantial progress in the months since. According to Dennis Lin of the San Diego Union-Tribune, he suffered a setback in his recovery process last week and is set to undergo a season-ending discectomy next Wednesday.

Over 285 plate appearances, Dickerson batted .257/.333/.455 with 10 home runs and a .788 OPS for the Padres in 2016. He missed several days with a right hip contusion last July, but hasn’t experienced any substantial health problems since undergoing surgery in 2014 to repair a torn ligament in his left ankle.

The expected recovery period for lower back surgery is 3-4 months, according to Lin, which puts Dickerson’s estimated return just a few days before the end of the regular season. The Padres aren’t scraping the bottom of the NL West, but their 29-44 record doesn’t bode well for a postseason run this year. Assuming Dickerson rehabs his back in a timely manner, he should be in fine form to enter the competition for left field next spring.

Video: Hanley Ramirez’s No. 250 career home run barely left the field

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Hanley Ramirez played a pivotal role during the Red Sox’ 9-4 win over the Angels on Friday night, crushing a two-run homer off of Alex Meyer to bring the Sox up to a four-run lead in the fourth inning.

Well, crushed might be the wrong word. The ball cleared the right field fence with a mere 350 feet, landing just beyond Pesky’s Pole to bring Ramirez’s career home run total to an even 250.

According to the ESPN Home Run Tracker, Ramirez’s milestone blast wasn’t the shortest home run of the year — not by a long shot. That distinction currently belongs to Rays’ outfielder Corey Dickerson, who skimmed the left field fence at Rogers Centre with a 326-foot homer back in April.