Baltimore Orioles v Arizona Diamondbacks

And That Happened: Tuesday’s scores and highlights

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Diamondbacks 4, Orioles 3: Paul Goldschmidt homered to tie it in the ninth, homered to win it in the 11th. It’s perhaps too late for this, but memo to Buck Showalter: maybe don’t pitch to Paul Goldschmidt. Two walkoff wins in a row for the Dbacks. Their ninth walkoff win of the year.

Yankees 14, Angels 7: Another two-homer performance, this one from Alfonso Soriano, who drove in six. As we’ve said a couple of times this week: nice career, Alfonso Soriano.

Mariners 5, Rays 4: A two-homer leadoff hitter show as the Mariners leadoff guy Brad Miller hit two homers as did the Rays leadoff hitter Ben Zobrist. After the game their managers each made them do pushups, Willie Mays Hayes-style, for hitting the ball in the air.

Brewers 5, Rangers 1: Another two-homer performance, this one from Scooter Gennett, whose bombs happened to be the first and second of his career. His teammates gave him the now ubiquitous “silent treatment” for his first homer, pretending not to acknowledge it for some time after he returned to the dugout. I think this is played out and teams need to go to the next level with this first-home-run hazing. How about this: they treat him as usual, giving him high-fives, then, after the game, the GM sends him down to Triple-A. He keeps up the joke until the player packs his bags, gets a flight to Nashville, plays in multiple minor league games and the starts to question whether or not he should go back home and start working for dad’s plumbing business. A couple of years later, as he finally locks up all of his baseball memorabilia in a closet he will never open again due to the overwhelming emotion such objects of his failed past bring, the GM calls him back and says “Haha, got ya!”

Nationals 4, Giants 2: Four wins in a row for Washington, which is nice. Not that it’s (a) getting them any closer to a playoff spot; or (b) making everyone in the dugout all happy.

Braves 3, Phillies 1: Kris Medlen hasn’t been anywhere close to as good this year as he was last year, but he’s turning it around. He notched his fourth straight win and is now 10-10 on the season. Phillies starter Ethan Martin has three major league starts under his belt. Two of them have been losses to Kris Medlen and the Braves. Meanwhile, Chris Johnson keeps hitting. He hit a two-run homer and leads the NL with a .337 average.

Red Sox 4, Blue Jays 2: A come-from-behind win with Shane Victorino knocking in two in the 11th inning. He also gunned down a runner at the plate earlier in the game. For a guy whose contract caused a lot of people to mock the Red Sox in the offseason, he’s been pretty darn useful for the Red Sox.

Reds 6, Cubs 4: Yet another extra-innings game. There were six in all last night.  Shin-Soo Choo did what Shane Victorino did — he hit a tiebreaking two-run single in the 11th inning — and Reds reliever J.J. Hoover shut out the Cubs on one hit in two and a third innings of work. He has a scoreless innings streak of 24 and two-thirds.

Cardinals 4, Pirates 3: A fourteen-inning tilt for the two best teams in the NL Central, with Adron Chambers singling home the winning run for St. Louis just before this game hit the five-hour mark. Thirteen pitchers and twenty-six position players were used in the game between both teams.

Padres 7, Rockies 5: Down 4-1 after the first inning the Padres didn’t fold. Nick Hundley homered and drove in two runs, Will Venable had three hits and San Diego put up four runs of their own in the second to give them a rare win over the Rockies.

White Sox 4, Tigers 3: Detroit is slumping. Recent ex-Tiger Avisail Garcia had two hits, drove in two and scored the winning run on Alejandro De Aza’s bases-loaded single in the 11th inning to give the pale hose a walkoff win.

Marlins 1, Royals 0: Jose Fernandez and Bruce Chen matched each other with seven, three-hit, six-strikeout scoreless innings. The Royals bullpen cracked first, however, although not until the tenth when Kelvin Herrera hit Jake Marisnick with a pitch, allowed him to steal second and then gave up the go-ahead RBI single to Christian Yelich.

Dodgers 4, Mets 2: Even Matt Harvey can’t stop the Los Angeles juggernaut. They win their seventh straight behind seven innings of one-run ball from Hyun-Jin Ryu. Dodgers starters are 13-1 with a 1.72 ERA in their last 18 games.

Indians 5, Twins 2: A much-needed win for the Tribe, which had lost seven of eight coming in. Zach Mcallister allowed on earned run in six, the bullpen held firm and Ryan Raburn hit a homer.

Astros 5, Athletics 4: Another bad outing for Bartolo Colon, who could be running out of gas at an inopportune time for Oakland. The Astros hit him up for five runs on seven hits in four innings. Meanwhile, Jordon Lyles allowed one run in seven.

Athletics sign Santiago Casilla to two-year, $11 million deal

MIAMI, FL - AUGUST 10: Santiago Casilla #46 of the San Francisco Giants throws a pitch during the 9th inning against the Miami Marlins at Marlins Park on August 10, 2016 in Miami, Florida. (Photo by Eric Espada/Getty Images)
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After letting rumors of the deal percolate for the last week, the Athletics officially announced their two-year, $11 million contract with right-hander Santiago Casilla on Friday (and threw a little bit of shade at the Giants, too). As previously reported, the contract includes an extra $3 million in performance bonuses.

Casilla, 36, got his major league start with Oakland back in 2004, racking up a 5.11 ERA and four saves over six seasons in the A’s bullpen. After picking up a minor league deal with the Giants in 2010, the righty flitted in and out of the closing role with varying degrees of success. Notwithstanding a slight downturn in his production rate during the 2016 season, he earned 123 saves and a 2.42 ERA during the past seven years in San Francisco. Securing another closing role might be a little tougher across the Bay, however, with a bullpen that includes fellow closers Ryan Madson, Ryan Dull and Sean Doolittle.

Keith Law: The Braves have the best farm system. Who has the worst?

PHOENIX, AZ - APRIL 06:  General manager Dave Stewart of the Arizona Diamondbacks laughs on the field before the Opening Day MLB game against the San Francisco Giants at Chase Field on April 6, 2015 in Phoenix, Arizona.  (Photo by Christian Petersen/Getty Images)
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Why is this man smiling? Man, I wouldn’t be smiling if I read what I just read.

This is the week when ESPN’s Keith Law releases his prospect and farm system rankings. He kicks off his content this week with a top-to-bottom ranking of all 30 farm systems. As a rule he limits his analysis to players who are currently in the minors and who have not yet exhausted their rookie of the year eligibility.

For the second straight year, Law ranks the Braves as the best system in baseball. Number two — making a big leap from last year’s number 13 ranking – is the New York Yankees. Dead last: the Arizona Diamondbacks, which Law says “Dave Stewart ritually disemboweled” over the past two years. That’s gotta hurt.

If you want to know the reasons and the rankings of everyone in between you’ll have to get an ESPN Insider subscription. Sorry, I know everyone hates to pay for content on the Internet, but Keith and others who do this kind of work put a lot of damn work into it and this is what pays their bills. I typically don’t like to pay for content myself, but I do pay for an ESPN Insider subscription. It’s worth it for Law’s work alone.