Baltimore Orioles v Arizona Diamondbacks

And That Happened: Tuesday’s scores and highlights


Diamondbacks 4, Orioles 3: Paul Goldschmidt homered to tie it in the ninth, homered to win it in the 11th. It’s perhaps too late for this, but memo to Buck Showalter: maybe don’t pitch to Paul Goldschmidt. Two walkoff wins in a row for the Dbacks. Their ninth walkoff win of the year.

Yankees 14, Angels 7: Another two-homer performance, this one from Alfonso Soriano, who drove in six. As we’ve said a couple of times this week: nice career, Alfonso Soriano.

Mariners 5, Rays 4: A two-homer leadoff hitter show as the Mariners leadoff guy Brad Miller hit two homers as did the Rays leadoff hitter Ben Zobrist. After the game their managers each made them do pushups, Willie Mays Hayes-style, for hitting the ball in the air.

Brewers 5, Rangers 1: Another two-homer performance, this one from Scooter Gennett, whose bombs happened to be the first and second of his career. His teammates gave him the now ubiquitous “silent treatment” for his first homer, pretending not to acknowledge it for some time after he returned to the dugout. I think this is played out and teams need to go to the next level with this first-home-run hazing. How about this: they treat him as usual, giving him high-fives, then, after the game, the GM sends him down to Triple-A. He keeps up the joke until the player packs his bags, gets a flight to Nashville, plays in multiple minor league games and the starts to question whether or not he should go back home and start working for dad’s plumbing business. A couple of years later, as he finally locks up all of his baseball memorabilia in a closet he will never open again due to the overwhelming emotion such objects of his failed past bring, the GM calls him back and says “Haha, got ya!”

Nationals 4, Giants 2: Four wins in a row for Washington, which is nice. Not that it’s (a) getting them any closer to a playoff spot; or (b) making everyone in the dugout all happy.

Braves 3, Phillies 1: Kris Medlen hasn’t been anywhere close to as good this year as he was last year, but he’s turning it around. He notched his fourth straight win and is now 10-10 on the season. Phillies starter Ethan Martin has three major league starts under his belt. Two of them have been losses to Kris Medlen and the Braves. Meanwhile, Chris Johnson keeps hitting. He hit a two-run homer and leads the NL with a .337 average.

Red Sox 4, Blue Jays 2: A come-from-behind win with Shane Victorino knocking in two in the 11th inning. He also gunned down a runner at the plate earlier in the game. For a guy whose contract caused a lot of people to mock the Red Sox in the offseason, he’s been pretty darn useful for the Red Sox.

Reds 6, Cubs 4: Yet another extra-innings game. There were six in all last night.  Shin-Soo Choo did what Shane Victorino did — he hit a tiebreaking two-run single in the 11th inning — and Reds reliever J.J. Hoover shut out the Cubs on one hit in two and a third innings of work. He has a scoreless innings streak of 24 and two-thirds.

Cardinals 4, Pirates 3: A fourteen-inning tilt for the two best teams in the NL Central, with Adron Chambers singling home the winning run for St. Louis just before this game hit the five-hour mark. Thirteen pitchers and twenty-six position players were used in the game between both teams.

Padres 7, Rockies 5: Down 4-1 after the first inning the Padres didn’t fold. Nick Hundley homered and drove in two runs, Will Venable had three hits and San Diego put up four runs of their own in the second to give them a rare win over the Rockies.

White Sox 4, Tigers 3: Detroit is slumping. Recent ex-Tiger Avisail Garcia had two hits, drove in two and scored the winning run on Alejandro De Aza’s bases-loaded single in the 11th inning to give the pale hose a walkoff win.

Marlins 1, Royals 0: Jose Fernandez and Bruce Chen matched each other with seven, three-hit, six-strikeout scoreless innings. The Royals bullpen cracked first, however, although not until the tenth when Kelvin Herrera hit Jake Marisnick with a pitch, allowed him to steal second and then gave up the go-ahead RBI single to Christian Yelich.

Dodgers 4, Mets 2: Even Matt Harvey can’t stop the Los Angeles juggernaut. They win their seventh straight behind seven innings of one-run ball from Hyun-Jin Ryu. Dodgers starters are 13-1 with a 1.72 ERA in their last 18 games.

Indians 5, Twins 2: A much-needed win for the Tribe, which had lost seven of eight coming in. Zach Mcallister allowed on earned run in six, the bullpen held firm and Ryan Raburn hit a homer.

Astros 5, Athletics 4: Another bad outing for Bartolo Colon, who could be running out of gas at an inopportune time for Oakland. The Astros hit him up for five runs on seven hits in four innings. Meanwhile, Jordon Lyles allowed one run in seven.

Photo of the Day: Colby Rasmus just wants to love on everybody

Colby Rasmus

Colby Rasmus hit a big home run last night to set off the scoring and to set the tone for the Astros.

After the game he spoke to Jeff Passan of Yahoo and voiced some nice perspective and maturity as well, acknowledging that his time and St. Louis and Toronto left him with a reputation that he’d rather not have follow him around forever, saying “I don’t want them to say Colby Rasmus was a piece of crap because he had all of this time and just wanted to be a douche. I just try to love on everybody.”

Fair. By the way, this is what Rasmus looked like either just before or just after telling reporters that he “just tries to love on everybody.”


Ready for some lovin’?

There’s no one to blame in Yankees’ loss

Joe Girardi

You’re going to boo All-Star Brett Gardner for striking out against a Cy Young contender?

You’re going to bash Alex Rodriguez for going hitless in another postseason game, three years after his last one?

Maybe you’d prefer to put it all on Masahiro Tanaka for giving up two solo homers to a lineup full of 20-homer guys?

The truth is that the Yankees were supposed to lose tonight. They were facing an outstanding left-hander with their forever-lefty-heavy lineup, and they simply didn’t have anyone pitching like an ace to set themselves up nicely for a one-game, winner-take-all showdown. The 3-0 result… well, that’s how this was supposed to go down.

It didn’t necessarily mean it would; what fun would it be if the better team always won? And the Astros might not even be a better team than the Yankees. However, the Astros with Dallas Keuchel on the mound were certainly a better team than the Yankees with whoever they picked to throw.

I just don’t see where it’s worth putting any blame tonight. Joe Girardi? He could have started John Ryan Murphy over Brian McCann against the tough lefty, but he wasn’t willing to risk Tanaka losing his comfort zone by using a backup catcher.

The front office could have added more talent, perhaps outbidding the Blue Jays for David Price or the Royals for Johnny Cueto, and set themselves up better for the postseason. However, that would have cost them Luis Severino and/or Greg Bird, both of whom went on to play key roles as the Yankees secured the wild card. Would it really have been worth it? I don’t think so.

Tanaka gave the Yankees what they should have expected. Had Keuchel’s stuff been a little off on short rest, Tanaka’s performance would have kept the Yankees in the game.

Keuchel, though, was on his game from the first pitch. The Astros bullpen might have been a bit more vulnerable, and late at-bats from Gardner, Carlos Beltran, Rodriguez and McCann definitely left something to be desired. Still, on the whole, the lack of offense was quite a team effort.

The Yankees got beat by a better team tonight.  I’m not sure the Astros would have been better in Games 2-7 in a longer series, but they had everything in their favor in this one.