Washington Nationals v Los Angeles Angels of Anaheim

Watch as the Nats start laying this year’s disaster at Davey Johnson’s feet

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A call for Davey Johnson’s head, some Heyman speculation that Matt Williams could be his replacement and now Amanda Comak of the Washington Times goes full-blown with the successor speculation:

Through discussions with industry and team sources, four possible names emerged as possibilities for when the Nationals begin their managerial search in earnest: Arizona Diamondbacks third base coach Matt Williams, Nationals bench coach Randy Knorr, Nationals third base coach Trent Jewett and Houston Astros manager Bo Porter.

Porter is the odd name there. Though he just came from Washington, it seems like a long shot in the extreme that the Astros would let him go after anointing him the steward of their rebuild so recently. Indeed, just this past March his general manager said this about him:

“People know Bo is going to be here for a long time,” Luhnow says. “He could be one of those guys who is an Astros manager for decades, not just years. The players knowing that this is the group that’s going to be here — it begins to lay the foundation for stability, which is really what we’re looking for.”

Not that they wouldn’t give him up for, I dunno, Bryce Harper or something. OK, maybe not anything that grand, but it would take Porter telling the Astros he really, really wanted the Nats job followed by the Nats giving up an awful lot to the Astros to let him out of his contract. And that really doesn’t make sense for anyone here. Teams shouldn’t be giving up real talent for a manager. Neither Porter nor the Astros would do well by being seen as abandoning a plan this quickly. Indeed, one of the biggest selling points to long-frustrated Astros fans right now is “hey, we may not have the talent yet, but boy howdy to we have a plan!” That’s actually appealing to people and Houston doesn’t want to mess with that.

But the biggest takeaway from all of this: I have this strong feeling that the next two months of the season will be filled with Nationals sources talking about new managers and a change in direction and philosophy, the likes of which there is plenty in Comak’s story. The reason: by doing so, team sources basically lay this season’s disaster at Johnson’s feet, absolving everyone who is still around for next year.

Not surprising. And not necessarily bogus. I mean, Johnson is a great manager, but he has messed up a good deal this season and isn’t blameless in what has gone on. I don’t think he can be blamed as much as the front office, but it’s not like he’s been an innocent bystander.  Still, laying the blame on Davey Johnson has happened many times in the past. The Mets, Reds, Dodgers and Orioles all felt a strong need to “change direction” following Johnson’s tenure, all either tacitly or plainly blaming Davey for what went wrong in the end.

Funny thing, though: teams have a habit of cratering even worse after Johnson leaves. And when that happens, everyone stops playing the blame-Davey game.

Someone stole Jose Fernandez’s high school jersey after a vigil

MIAMI, FL - JULY 09:  Jose Fernandez #16 of the Miami Marlins pitches during the game against the Cincinnati Reds at Marlins Park on July 9, 2015 in Miami, Florida.  (Photo by Rob Foldy/Getty Images)
Getty Images
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People are the absolute worst sometimes. The latest example: someone stole one of Jose Fernandez’s high school jerseys, which had been displayed in his old high school’s dugout for a vigil last night.

That report comes from Anastasia Dawson of the Tampa Bay Times who covered the vigil at Alonso High School in Tampa yesterday. Her story of the vigil is here. Today she has been tweeting about the theft of the jersey. She spoke to Alonso High school’s principal who, in a bit of understatement, called the theft the “lowest of the low.”

The high school had one more Fernandez jersey remaining and has put it on display in the school. In the meantime, spread this story far and wide so that whatever vulture who stole it can’t sell it.

 

What Hall of Fame-eligible pitcher would you ask to pitch today?

Mike Mussina
Associated Press
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In an earlier post I made a joke about the Indians starting Dennis Martinez if forced to play a meaningless (for them) game on Monday against the Tigers. On Twitter, one of my followers, Ray Fink, asked a great question: If you had to hand the ball to a Hall of Fame-eligible pitcher to give you three innings, who would it be?

The Hall of Fame-eligible part gets rid of the recently-retired ringers, requiring a guy who has been off the scene for at least five years, ensuring that there’s a good bit of rust. I love questions like these.

My immediate answer was Mike Mussina. My thinking being that of all of the great pitchers fitting these parameters, he’s the most likely to have stayed in good shape. I mean, Greg Maddux probably still has the best pitching IQ on the planet, but he’s let himself go a bit, right? Mussina strikes me as a guy who still wakes up and does crunches and stuff.

If you extend it to December, however, you may get a better answer, because that’s when Tim Wakefield becomes eligible for the Hall. I realize a knuckleball requires practice to maintain the right touch and subtlety to the delivery, but it also requires the least raw physical effort. Jim Bouton went well more than five years without throwing his less-than-Wakefield-quality knuckler and was still able to make a comeback. I think Tim could be passable.

Then there’s Roger Clemens. I didn’t see his numbers for that National Baseball Congress tourney this summer and I realize he’s getting a bit thick around the middle, but I’m sure he can still bring it enough to not embarrass himself. Beyond the frosted tips, anyway.

So: who is your Space Cowboys-style reclamation project? Who is the old legend you dust off for one last job?